FIRE LOSSES IN THE PAST MONTH.

FIRE LOSSES IN THE PAST MONTH.

There were during March 266 fires, the loss from which aggregated $10,000 and over. Comparing this with February, there were 287 such fires, and in January, 494, or a total of 1,047 for the three months of the year. The fires are to be classified as follows: 87 up to $20,000; 46, not over $30,000; 29, $50,000; 34, $75,000; 17, $100,000; 41, 200,000, and 12 over $200,000. The total losses by fire in the United States and Canada during March, 1918, were $20,213,980. This is an increase over the showing of March, 1917, of over two and a half million dollars. On the other hand, the figures fall short of the same period in 1916 of about $18,000,000. This is accounted for by the fact that in March, two years ago there were three fires entailing very heavy losses, in Paris, Tex.; Augusta, Ga., and Nashville, Tenn. Comparing the March losses with those of February, we find that they arc about the same, and in consequence the losses in the first three months of the year, in spite of the quite heavy figures of January, compare favorably with those of either 1917 or 1916. In January, 1916, the total losses were $21,423,350; in January, 1917, $36,431,770, and in January, 1918, $37,575,100 In February, 1916, $24,770,770; 1917, $28,587,660, and 1918. $20,688,155; in March, 1916, $38,680,250; 1917, $17,523,000, and 1918, $20,213,980. This brings the totals of the three months in 1916 to $84,874,370; in 1917, $83,542,430, and in 1918, $78,477,235, as before remarked, a quite respectable reduction for the year 1918. One reason for this rather encouraging showing probably can be found in the added precautions being taken, both in government and private circles, in the direction of fire prevention, and also in the added vigilance in guarding against incendiarism, especially in plants engaged in government work. Thus the constant and emphatic agitation constantly being carried on by all the agencies connected with the fire service along the lines of fire prevention is apparently beginning to bear fruit, which is well, for, as this journal has so often pointed out, it is less costly to prevent a fire than to extinguish it. It is to be hoped this reduction will continue and 1918 will prove a banner year through the efforts to prevent the heavy losses of the past.

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