FIRE MARSHALS OF N. AMERICA HOLD CONVENTION IN MEMPHIS

FIRE MARSHALS OF N. AMERICA HOLD CONVENTION IN MEMPHIS

Tracy of Iowa New President— Large Fire in Progress as Delegates Meet at Dinner

ABOUT seventy-five delegates assembled for the annual convention of the Fire Marshals’ Association of North America held in Memphis, Tenn., during October 13-15. The welcome to the city was extended by Mayor Rowlett Paine. At one of the meetings, Chester E. Johnson of Montgomery. state fire marshal ot Alabama and president of the association said, “Prevention ot fire is the most important part of the public service of a fire marshal. Education will accomplish that which law can not.” It was brought out during tin course of the discussion that the lire marshal has many problems to contend with, such as indifferent public officials, poor legislation, lack of co-operation in official circles, and other contributory causes that tend to make the prosecution of arson cases difficult.

Thomas 11. Allen, fire and police commissioner of Memphis, gave a graphic history of the development of lire prevention work in the city. He called tlie attention of the delegates to the fact that legislation was being introduced for reducing tinhazards resulting from the use of gasoline. (Inshingle roof and other common hazards. The commissioner praised the work of the Chamber of C onunerce and other assisting agencies for the reduction of the city’s losses. An arson squad of the police department was organized.

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Fire Marshals Hold Convention

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Franklin Wentworth secretary of the National Fire Protection Association, commented on the fine record of Memphis. He said that it was the most complete discussion of a city’s progress in fire prevention that he had ever heard.

The problem of financial support from the government was introduced by Edward S. Gillenwaters, state fire marshal of Tennessee.

‘The government of these United States spends millions of dollars in an endeavor to stop the sale of intoxicating liquors, with the object of conserving the lives of our people. Suppose the government should spend a like amount with the same determination to stop the fire waste. What would be the result ?” asked M r. uillenwaters.

A “mulligan” dinner was arranged for the entertainment of the delegates, and while it was in progress at the fire house, twn alarms wire received-—one calling for four companies at a kiln fire. The fire chiefs present quietly left the station and jumped into their cars that were parked in the alley nearby. None of the guests realized that a large fire was in progress.

At the election of officers, J. A. Tracy, state fire marshal of Des Moines, Ia., was elected president for 1927. He will succeed Chester E. Johnson who will become a member of the executive committee. W. A. Elstun, Kansas state fire marshal, was elected vice-president, and C. L. Topping of Charleston, W Va., was chosen secretary-treasurer.

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