FIRE NEWS FROM LONEON, ONT.

FIRE NEWS FROM LONEON, ONT.

Correspondence of Fnuo & WATER ENGINEERING.

Chief Engineer W. L. Clark, of this city’s fire department, was taken completely by surprise on the night of December 11. when, after the meeting of No. 3 committee, all went over to the fireball, where representatives of all the stations in the city were present. They were ushered up to the assembly room by Foreman Case, of No. 1 station, where Alderman Gillean summoned the chief. He was confronted by the chairman of No. 3. who read a set of resolutions appreciative of the good work done for the fire department l>v him during bis four years of office—a work thoroughly appreciated by the citizens of London. The resolutions likewise praised the chief for the impartiality, all-round fairness and kindness with which lie had always treated his subordinates, without any sacrifice of discipline. 1 hey alluded to his efforts in the way of securing a considerable increase in the salaries of the firemen, and expressed their confidence in him and their “appreciation of his many kindnesses and thoughtful regard for [their] interests.” The committee, consisting of D. McDonald, truck foreman. J. D. Findlater, foreman No. 2, C. Ferguson, driver No. 1, and G. Taylor, foreman No. 3, then begged him to accept as a token of his men’s regard a very handsome set of silver, consisting of five pieces. Fireman George Gray, the oldest member of the force, made the presentation, and Alderman Gillean spoke of the many estimable qualities of the chief, and declared it was indeed a great privilege to work with a man who had the interests of the city, and, also, his men, at heart. Chief Clark (he added) had won the highest regard of the citizens of London -mice coming there, and till admired him for his ability and for his sterling character. Chief Clark, who had been taken completely by surprise, in a few feeling and appropriate, remarks, heartily thanked the men of the department for their kindness. He said that, as he had done in the past, so in tlie future he would always do what he could for tin interests of the men. He gave No. 3 committee a large share of the credit for the efficiency of the department, as that committee had done all in its power to assist him and the men. At the conclusion of his speech Chief Clark received a hearty cheer from the firemen present, after which Aldermen Gerry and Booth, members of No. 3 committee, spoke of the excellent qualities of Chief Clark and the members of tlie brigade. London may well be proud (they declared) of its fire department, as there were few equals, and no superiors to it in this country. They congratulated him and wished him long life and prosperity. A leading local paper says that, -since coming to London, Chief Clark has made the fire department a “distinct credit to the citizens and has worked hard and faithfully. The men are loyal to him and declare he has their interests at heart at all times. The evening wound up with an exhibition given by the brigade in honor of the visitors.—A somewhat serious fire occurred in this city on December 12, the result of which was the gutting of the interior of a dvvellinghouse. The fire broke out in the kitchen of Isaac Levy’s residence, where the coaloil stove, which appeared to be working all right, suddenly exploded. Mrs. Levy, who was standing at some distance off, had a narrow escape from the blazing oil, which flew all round. Her hands were seriously burned; but fortunately her clothes did not ignite. In a moment the whole kitchen was ablaze. 1 he fire brigade was summoned by telephone; but. as the directions had not been properly given, the firemen did not at first know where to go. When they did reach the scene, they soon extinguished the fire. The furniture was badly damaged and a large wardrobe was practically ruined by the flames, which ran through the whole house.* The building itself was not badly damaged.

Two Views ol Ruins of Fifth Floor Willis-Smith-Crall Fire, Norfolk, Va.

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