Fire News From Massachusetts.

Fire News From Massachusetts.

Edward V. Stone, of engine company, Boston, has accepted the position of chief of the Ludlow fire department.—The sudden death is announced of Joshua Crooks, one of the last four surviving members of the original Barmcoat volunteer fire company of Boston. He was seventy-four years of age.—In the fall the common council of Boston will be asked to increase all the salaries in that city’s fire department. The present salaries are as follows: Chief, $4,000; deputy chief, $2,400; second deputy chief, $2,200; district chief, $2,000; captain, $t,6oo; lieutenant, $1,400; engineer, $1,300, and private, $1,200. There is no movement in the line of another day off; one day in every five is a perfectly satisfactory arrangement.—On May 25 Patrick J. Graham’s paper stock warehouse on Ewer street was burned. The building was 2-story about loo ft. by 50 ft. The fire was a very fierce one and kept the firemen hard at work for some hours, owing to the inflammable nature of its contents. The flames were well kept off from a large wooden stable distant only 5 ft. from the burning warehouse; but for some time it looked as if the whole structure must be destroyed. In it were stabled sixty horses, which were saved with great difficulty. In the course of the fight seven firemen were injured. When the flames were fiercest, the front wall of the building came down with a run, and a ladder on which the firemen were standing came down with it. They had a narrow escape from death. Two were so badly hurt that they were taken to the hospital; the others were sent home.— Chief B. Ernest Wilkes has been elected president of the Centre Abington Firemen’s Relief association and Sumner L. Deane, secretary. The association has nearly $600 in its treasury.— At the Chelsea conflagration the Malden fire department under Chief Turner saved the plants of the Standard Oil company, a box factory, a lumberyard and storage warehouse, and eight out of twenty-five buildings on Everett avenue. The department has received several checks in appreciation of its good work, and the men well deserved them, as they were uninterruptedly on duty for over nineteen hours and had their positions changed several times during that period. It may be added that the Standard Oil company’s check was for $50 only 1—’The new fire-alarm telegraph system now in use at Brockton has just beeti installed by the Gamewell company. It is of the most modern type. It combines a manual and automatic fire-alarm, and is arranged for twelve box-circuits, four tapper, and four bell-circuits. It will give quicker and better service getting the apparatus out in just half the time. As automatic, the alarm reaches the department very quickly and is received on the indicators and a small 6-in. gong and at the same time is passed through the fast and slow transmitter, where the number of the box is recorded and the time changed to slow. After the first round of the box bas gone out on fast time, this machine automatically transmits the signal to the gong and bell-circuits at the present speed of 2½ seconds between blows. The alarms are also recorded on taperegisters, and six or more can be received at once without any confus on resulting. Thus if a second fire or more should break out at the same time, there would be no trouble over locating them. The system is likewise arranged for a straight manual one, as it will be during the day time, when the superintendent or his assistants are on hand. The alarms will then come in on a small tap-bell and the recording registers mentioned above, at the same time lighting a red light on the operating board and controTing switches. When the first round has been received correctly, by moving one switch, the office can be instantly thrown into automatic and the second, third and fourth rounds go directly to the department, or, if any of the apparatus should be out of order, alarm can be sent either quick-time to the tappers and indicators, or slowtime to the large bells, by the use of the manual transmitter.—Ipswich has elected Augustus J. Barton chief of its fire department.—A chief’s gold badge has been presented to Chief Peter F. Graham of Methuen, by the members of company L, Eighth regiment M. V. M.—Swampscott has re-elected George P. Cahoon chief of its fire department and Gardner has done the same for George S. Hodgdon.—Melrose ought to have better firefighting equipment and firemen. At present there are only seven permanent and thirty-six call men. Two new hosehouses should also be built and equiped. A chemical engine and an alarm whistle would be a great help to the department. All the firemen, from Chief Joseph Edwards downwards, are well worth much better salaries.—Uxbridge has elected A. S. Allen as its fire chief; Billerica, George C. Crosby; North Easton, George Baldwin; Hopedale, Samuel E. Kellogg; Athol, Joseph A. Dunbar; Milford, Thomas F. Maher, re-elected.

Fire News From Massachusetts.

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Fire News From Massachusetts.

Up to April 12 Methuen had a permanent force of two men. A cypher now represents their number.—Why a Lynnfield citizen should have applied for an injunction to restrain the town from raising $4,000 towards building quarters for the new chemical engine, no one but himself can understand.—Chicopee has added a new auto hook and ladder truck to its fire protective apparatus.—Royalston will soon build permanent quarters for its new chemical engine, which at present is housed in 14 x ,50 in. barn.—Webster has voted to spend the sum of $350011 the purchase of 500 ft. of hose. Cheap hose is a poor speculation at best. The town would also purchase an auto combination and chemical hose wagon, if it could get one for $1,000.—The fire protection of Spencer will involve an expenditure of $4,400—cheap enough, but what does the town expects to get for it?—The salary of the fire chief at Marlboro has been fixed at $350 for the year; those of the district chiefs at $100. The city has voted $13,415 for regular fire department expenses and $1,200 for new hose and incidentals.— A new system of bookkeeping is recommended to the board of engineers of Hudson and the city has voted $4,300 for the expenses of the fire department during 1908.—Ou May 1, after having served in the position of head of the Needham fire department for fifteen years Chief ii. A. Kingsbury will retire from the service. 11c was one of the originators of that city’s fire department.—Chief Osborne, of Newburyport, refuses to approve the bills of the call men for service at a recent fire, which had been approved by the committee on the fire department, it will have to be legally decided whether or not over time is recognised in the city’s fire ordinance.—By a vote of 3 to 2 the Marblehead board of fire wards has determined to pay the firemen who last year were turned out of the service by a vote, also of 3 to 2.—S. II. Finnell has been elected a district chief at New Bedford.—If Sutton really needs and desires to purchase two chemical engines, it must not expect to get them for a mere song.—Rcvere’s board of engineers has dispensed with the services of nine call men and as many substitutes for having been absent sixty per cent of alarms fiom January 1 to April I.—Memorial Sunday will be celebrated on June 14 by the Veteran Firemen’s association of Boston.—At Melrose, while fighting a $25,000, second-alarm fire in the dwelling of A. Z. Cotes the cupola suddenly fell, just missing the firemen who were working on the blaze from ladders. Although the fire burned from basement to roof, the diningroom. in which was a quantity of valuable silver was barely scorched by the flames.— Holyoke has purchased a new second-size engine.—Uxbridge has re-elected Fire Chief Allen.—Beverly has appropriated $13,181.34 for its fire department.