Fire Notes from Cleveland

Fire Notes from Cleveland

The firemen’s union started mandamus proceedings on October 24 against the city and Director Sprosty to compel them to enforce the eight-hour law, preventing the chiefs and their drivers from working more than the eight hours. They are at present working twenty-four hours on and twenty-four hours off. This case was to come up before Judge Lavine, but before brought to trial the firemen’s union withdrew their case.

The illustration herewith shows First Assistant Chief James E. Granger of Cleveland, Ohio, fire department in his new Cadillac roadster. Chief Granger has been a member of his department for twenty-seven years and is considered one of the most progressive fire department officers in his section of the country. He is a strict disciplinarian, a good organizer and is very popular with the officers and members of the department. He is a past potentate of the Shrine. During the recent absence of Chief Wallace owing to the death of his wife, Chief Granger was in charge of the Cleveland fire department.

J. F. MEARS.

First Assistant Chief James E. Granger, Cleveland Fire Department, Standing Beside His New Car

Fire Notes From Cleveland

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Fire Notes From Cleveland

(From our Regular Correspondent)

What with the eight-hour day and the shortage of men, the fire department is approaching the condition of a volunteer department. The insurance risk has been very greatly increased. Many companies respond to fires with an acting man in charge, the balance of the crew being recruits. In many cases it has been found necessary to send in a second alarm in order to get enough men to properly do the work. At least 300 men should be added at once, so as to bring the department up to near what it should be to properly perform what is required of it. A school of instruction should be established at once. Captains of companies seldom see men on the opposite tour of duty, and often report: “I know nothing about this man—simply see him going and coming.” Such conditions should be remedied at once.

While responding to Box 228 on September 20, Engine Company No. 2’s wagon hit a man who persisted in not heeding the bell, and it is not expected that he will live. The steamer also threw off one of its large rubber tires and hit a woman, who is in a serious condition. Both accidents occurred while responding to the same alarm, an awning fire at the Erie Hotel, with slight damage.