FIRE NOTES FROM LITTLE FALLS.

FIRE NOTES FROM LITTLE FALLS.

(Special correspondence of FIRE AND WATER.)

LITTLE FALLS, N. Y., August 2, 1901.

Early this morning Stafford & Holt’s machine shop on the island directly in the rear of the Rockton knitting mill was discovered to be on fire. The alarm was at once turned in, and before the factory alarm whistle had been blown by the night watchman, Chief Cooney and the department were on the spot. They made the long run within five minutes—a recordbreaking run in the history of the department, so far as a night alarm is concerned. The flames, which must have made great headway before the alarm was sent in, were bursting out all over the roof. Four streams were at once brought to bear on the burning building,and two additional lines of hose were laid, ready to protect the Rockwood mill. The event proved this to be a necessary precaution, as the frame addition to that mill caught fire several times. The firemen, however, were on the alert and did not give the flames a chance. By dint of hard fighting Chief Cooney and his corps of firefighters got the blaze under control within half an hour. Of the valuable machinery and contents much was, of course, ruined, but not to the extent that was feared at first, when the destruction of the whole building seemed inevitable. The total loss will be about $6,500, of which only $500 is on the building. The fire started in an annealing box in the blacksmith’s shop, and crept up the shaft to the roof. The work of the firemen was splendid — The Cheney Hammer company, who had a similar experience with fire a short time ago, has sent a check for $50 for the benefit of the firemen, in recognition of the company’s appreciation of the good sendee rendered by the department at the Mill street fire. The money will form the nucleus of a firemen’s fund, and such an organization will probably be formed at once.—Chief Cooney is most indefatigable in inspecting the fire alarm system, and also in seeing that the fire escajie law is well observed. He has detected more than one hotel where the law is not kept and has reported accordingly.—The question of caring for the fire hydrants has come np. The board of police and fire commissioners ‘is divided on the subject. Tbe majority thinks the work of inspection and repair belongs to the board of public works, as the city pays $6,500 for their use. The minority (of one) thinks the fire and police board should be responsible for the work. The majority will probably carry the day.

Thomas Haney, of Atlanta, Ga., father of Assistant Chief Haney, of that city, Chief Haney, of the fire depiartment of Jacksonville, Fla., and grandfather of G. L. Haney, of the Atlanta fire department, is dead at the age of eighty-one. The deceased was a prominent member of the old volunteer fire department of Atlanta, and served with No. 1 company. He was elected chief of the department for three consecutive terms.

FIRE NOTES FROM LITTLE FALLS.

FIRE NOTES FROM LITTLE FALLS.

(Special correspondence of FIRE AND WATER.)

LITTLE FALLS, N. Y., April 7, 1901.

The following changes iu the fire department of this city have just taken place: Deputy Chief Wood resigned and has moved out of city. At the regular monthly meeting of the fire and police board on Friday night his resignation was accepted, and Frank R. Belling and Dennis J. Dineen (both now employed as drivers of American Express company wagons), being the highest two in the eligible list of candidates, were appointed as drivers. The salary of the newly-appointed men will be $50 a month_Fireman Fred E.

Ingraham was promoted to the position of deputychief engineer.—At the meetingof the board a proposition from the Exempt Firemen’s association was read. This association offers to furnish twenty men to respond to lire calls on the south side of the river—making another company.—Governor Odell has signed the bill providing $2,000 for this city to -buy fire apparatus The contract has been given to the Combination Ladder company, of Providence, R. I., for a combination chemical engine and hook and ladder truck, with trussed ladders.