Fire Protection at New Orleans

Fire Protection at New Orleans

Fire losses of nearly a third less than the preceding year attest the extent of the protection afforded New Orleans by the fire department the past year, when 599 alarms, 556 of which were for actual fires, the city escaped with the comparatively light property loss of $420,216, as compared with $660,414 for the preceding year. The insurance involved was $4,095,385, as against $3,822,453 the preceding year. The fire department at present consists of the following companies : Thirty-one steam-engine companies, two aerial hook and ladder truck companies, eight city service hook and ladder truck companies, five auto hose companies, three hose companies, one combination hose and chemical company, one auto chemical engine company, one water tower company and five chemical engine companies, making a grand total of 57 companies. The roster of the fire department shows: One chief engineer, one senior assistant engineer, seven assistant engineers, one master machinist, one assistant master machinist, one secretary-treasurer, one department physician, one veterinary surgeon, one secretary to the chief engineer, one messenger, one storekeeper and 421 officers and men, or a grand total of 438. During the past year the department has added to its force the following pieces of apparatus, viz.:

In September, 1911, a hook and ladder company was installed in the new engine house located on Louisiana avenue, near Liberty, composed of seven men and known as Truck Company No. 10.

January 1, 1912, Chemical Companies Nos. 9 and 12 were consolidated into an auto hose company composed of seven men and located at Fern and Jeannette streets. A new company composed of seven men was installed in a new engine house at Laurel and Upperline streets, known as Hose Company No. 7. A new company was formed and installed in the engine house on Napoleon avenue and Pitt street, known as Auto Hose Company No. 7. and composed of seven men. Engine Cornpany No. 11 was transferred from Napoleon avenue and Pitt street to engine house located on Louisiana avenue, near Liberty. This company is composed of seven men.

CHIEF PUJOL, NEW ORLEANS, LA.

January 15, 1912, chemical engine No. 8 was retired from service, and with four men added to its crew, Hose Company No. 8 was formed and installed in the new engine house at Upperline and Frett.

January 1, 1912, three men were added to Hose Company No. 6, making it a seven-man company instead of four, as formerly.

February 1, 1912, Chemical Company No. 10 was increased from a four-man company to a seven-man company, the chemical engine being displaced by an auto hose wagon, and the company, known as Auto Hose Company No. 1, located at Carrollton avenue and Moss.

FIRE PROTECTION AT NEW ORLEANS.

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FIRE PROTECTION AT NEW ORLEANS.

An engineer of the committee of twenty, who recently visited New Orleans to ascertain what has been accomplished in the matter of fire protection improvements, says in his report: “The only improvement actually accomplished in the water supply situation in New Orleans since the report is the provision of some, but not enough, fire protection apparatus at the pumping station in the city proper, The proposed works are being energetically pushed, in general accordance with the original plan. These plans now contemplate the measurement of consumption by pitometer, the hydrant distribution recommended in the report of June, 1905, and a proper intake structure and clarification of the water at Algiers. The fire department has not been materially strengthened The recommendations called for an addition of seven engines and two ladder companies and a total increase in the force of 167 men. No additional company has been established and only twenty-two men added to the force. Economical reasons may have interfered with the carrying out of most of the recommendations, but there are several on the list that couldi be adopted with little or no expense. With regard to improvements in the conflagration hazard, the engineer reports: “Fair progress is being made, four risks having been sprinkled, one of which has also been protected by an outside water curtain. Arrangements have been made for sprinkler systems in six other risks, one also to have ah outside water curtain equipment. Several risks have added fire doors, elevator traps and other protective devices, largely owing to the application of a rating schedule after careful inspection by the Louisiana fireprotection bureau.”