FIRE PROTECTION IN NEW YORK CITY.

FIRE PROTECTION IN NEW YORK CITY.

AS is usual the annual report, of the fire department of New York city is contained in a formidable volume of 138 pages, in which appear all the details connected with it, set down with the extremest accuracy. The list of fires is formidable. Fifty-four in the borough of Manhattan are set down as notable, one being that of June 30, 1900, which destroyed the North German Lloyd docks and steamships at Hoboken, N. J. The total number of calls in the three boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Richmond during the year was 6,033: in Brooklyn and Queens there were 3,293, of which thirteen were notable. In the boroughs of Manhattan, the Bronx, and Richmond it took 60,342,679 gallons of water (28,039,325 from the river) to extinguish the fires, of which 2,925 took place between 6 a. m. and 6 p. m., and 2,786 during the other twelve hours. In Brooklyn and Queens 50,126,368 gallons of water (22,584,630 from the river) were used in putting out fires. In the two boroughs last named there were five indictments for arson—all the accused being men. In the other boroughs four women and three men were arrested for the same crime. The number of employes at headquarters doing fire service in the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx is 1,549. Of these thirty-four are not uniformed; the remainder form the bureau of the chief of the department as follows: Chief ; deputy chiefs, over three divisions; three; battalion chiefs, sixteen; foremen, assistant foremen, and firemen, 1,390: uniformed fireboat force, twenty-two; fire alarm telegraph office, fifty-two; fire marshal and office, ten; hospital and training stables,twelve. The equipment is as follows: Steamers sixty-nine—nine double companies ; fireboats, four; hook and ladder companies twenty-three—three double companies (the double engine and hook and ladder companies have twenty; one officers and men, two sets of apparatus, double teams of horses; only one set goes out at a time to the same fire); three water towers, La France electrical search-light engine; hose wagon for each engine company,chemical engines,fuel wagons,chief’s buggies, etc. The personnel in Brooklyn and Queens numbers 1,168, with twentysix chief officers set over sixteen battalions. There are sixty engine companies and seventy-nine hook and ladder companies, water tower, chemical engines, two fireboats, hose wagons for all the engine companies, chiefs ’ buggies, and the like. The actual uniformed force numbers 1,059 In the bureau of conbustibles are fifteen men; fire marshal’s, seven: tire alarm telegraph, twenty-one; repair shop,s forty; hospital and training stables, five. In Richmond borough the departments are volunteer, as follows: North Shore;, Edgewater; Tottenville; Huguenot; Kreischerville; and New Dorp, with 128 offlcersl,590 men; ten steamers; twelve hook and ladder trucks; eighteen hose wagons and reels; and. two hand engines. In that borough and those of Manhattan and the Bronx are 1,285 fire alarm boxes the property of, and kept up by the city and 2,145 private auxiliaries outside of the department. ID Brooklyn and Queens are 1,280 fire alarm boxes In service and thirty-two circuits. There are 929,3208 miles of electrical wire In service. The list of medal men for Manhattan and the Bronx includes the names of Sweet and Quinn for gallantry at a fire in the Bowery—W’here Chief Croker also earned a similar decoration, but waived his claim in favor of his comrades. The medal men for 1898And 1899 were as follows: 1898—Lieutenant .Tohn Hughes (Bennett), Lieutenant Joseph Quinn (Bonner); Lieutenant Andrew B. Sweet (Trevor-Warren); Captain William C. Braisted (Stephenson). 1899—Lieutenant Andrew Fitzgerald (Bennett); Fireman Fredenburg, hook and ladder No. 14 (Trevor-Warren); Captain Thomas Larkin (Stephenson) Eighteen names were added to the roll of merit for life-saving.} In Brooklyn and Queens nine names were placed on the roll of merit for brave deeds performed at. personal risk.

CHIEF CROKER.

The Relief fond of the department showed a balance of $1,307,587.04, and the Life Insurance fund, one of $21,537.99. Altogether this report shows that the fire department of Greater New York keeps up its high reputation for efficiency, discipline, and bravery, and stands well in the forefront of the fire departments of the world.

No posts to display