Fire Protection in the Smaller Community

Fire Protection in the Smaller Community

From the Viewpoint of an Underwriters’ Engineer

This is the thirty-seventh installment of an important series of articles appearing regularly in FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING covering fire protection in all its phases for the guidance of fire officials in the smaller towns and villages.

(Continued from last issue)

ORDINANCES (Continued)

Continuation of an ordinance proidding for the prevention of fires and for the construction, equipment and use of buildings and the establishment of fire limits in the Town of………………..

SECTION 20. Steam and hot water pipes. No steam or hot water pipe shall be within one inch of any woodwork. Every steam or hot water pipe passing through combustible floors or ceilings, or wooden lath and plaster partitions, shall be protected by a metal tube one inch larger in diameter than the pipe and be provided with a metal cap. All wooden boxes or casings enclosing steam or hot water heating pipes, or wooden covers to recesses in walls in which steam or hot water heating pipes are placed, shall be lined with metal.

SECTION 21. Stoves and ranges. No furnace, boiler, stove, range or other heating appliance in any building shall be placed less than three feet from any woodwork or wooden lath and plaster partition, unless the woodwork or partition is protected by metal shields so installed as to preserve an air space between tbe metal and the material to be protected, in which case the distance shall be not less than 18 inches.

Hotel and restaurant ranges shall be provided with a metal hood, placed at least nine inches below any wooden lath and plaster or wooden ceiling, and having an individual pipe outlet connected with a good brick flue. The pipe shall be protected by at least one inch of asbestos covering or its equivalent.

Combustible floors under coal ranges and similar appliances without legs, in which hot fires are maintained, shall be protected by a sheet of metal or a one-eighth inch layer of asbestos board, which shall be covered with not less than four inches of masonry set in cement mortar. Such masonry may consist of one course of four inch hollow terra cotta or of two courses of brick or terra cotta, at least one of which shall be hollow and be laid to preserve a free circulation of air throughout the whole course. Concrete may be substituted for a course of solid brick, if desired. Tbe masonry work shall be covered by a metal sheet of not less than No. 26 gauge, so arranged as a metal sheet of not less than No. 26 gauge, so arranged as not to obstruct the ventilating passages beneath. Such hearths shall extend at least 24 inches in front and 12 inches on the sides and back of the heating appliance.

All coal stoves and ranges, with legs, shall be set on incombustible material which shall extend at least 12 inches in front.

No furnace, boiler range or other heating appliance shall be placed against a wall furred with wood.

SECTION 22. Open flame heating devices. All gas, gasoline, oil or charcoal burning stoves or beating devices shall be placed on metal stands at least six inches above combustible supports, which shall, in all cases, be protected by metal or asbestos shields. No open flame lighting device, stove or other beating appliance shall be used in any room where gasoline or other flammable volatile liquids are stored or handled, except steam or hot water radiators, unless approved for the purpose by Underwriters’ Laboratories.

SECTION 23. Vent flues. Vent flues and ducts, for tbe removal of foul and vitiated air, in which the temperature of the air cannot exceed that of tbe rooms, shall be constructed of metal or other incombustible material, and shall not be placed nearer than one inch to any woodwork, and no such flue shall be used for any other purpose.

SECTION 24. Safety of design. All parts of every building shall be designed to carry safely the loads to be imposed thereon, and in all other respects shall conform to good engineering practice.

SECTION 25. Duties of the enforcing officer. The Chief of the Fire Department is hereby authorized and directed;

First: To enforce all ordinances relating to the construction, equipment, management and condition of all property within the Town of ……….

Second: To supervise the construction or reconstruction of all buildings.

Third: To reixirt monthly to the Mayor and Town Council regarding the condition of the town on all matters pertaining to fire prevention.

SECTION 26. Penally for violations. Any and all persons who shall violate any of the provisions of this ordinance, or fail to comply therewith, or who shall viola_____e or fail to comply with any order or regulation made thereunder, or who shall build in violation of any detailed statement of specifications or plans submitted and approved thereunder, or any permit or certificate issued thereunder, shall severally for each and every such violation and non-compliance respectively forfeit and pay a penalty in tbe sum of twenty-live dollars. The imposition of one penalty for any violation of this ordinance shall not excuse the violation, or permit it to continue; and all such persons shall be required to correct or remedy such violations or defects within a reasonable time; and when not otherwise specified, each ten days that prohibited conditions are maintained shall constitute a separate offense.

The application of tbe above penalty shall not be held to prevent tbe enforced removal of prohibited conditions as provided in Section 2 of this ordinance.

SECTION 27. Conflicting ordinances repealed. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed.

SECTION 28. Dale of effect. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage and legal publication.

(To he Continued.)

Beverly, Pa., Celebrates Anniversary—Beverly Fire Company No. 1 of Beverly, Pa., celebrated its thirty-ninth annual anniversary.

McVeytown, Pa., Purchases Chemical Car—McVeytown, Pa., has purchased a Ford chassis on which is mounted three chemical tanks and other department equipment.

Pennsgrove, N. J., Planning to Entertain Firemen—The firemen of Pennsgrove, N. J., are making plans for the entertainment of the annual meeting of the Salem County Firemen’s Association to be held on September 14.

Amherst, O., Entertains Lorain-co Association—The firemen of Amherst, Ohio, entertained tbe members of the Lorain-co Volunteer Firemen’s Association at Crystal Beach with a picnic —this took the place of the usual convention.

Another Example of Water Works and Fire Department Cooperation The young ladies of the Jamestown, N. Y. water department prepared to man the apparatus of the fire department.

Fire Protection in the Smaller Community

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Fire Protection in the Smaller Community

From the Viewpoint of an Underwriters’ Engineer

This is the thirty-sixth installment of an important series of articles appearing regularly in FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING covering fire protection in all its phases for the guidance of fire officials in the smaller towns and villages.

(Continued from last issue)

ORDINANCES (Continued)

Continuation of an ordinance providing for the prevention of fires and for the construction, equipment and use of buildings and the establishment of fire limits in the Town of………………..

SECTION 17. Wooden beams separated from masonry chimneys. No wooden beams or joists shall be placed within two inches of the outside face of a chimney or flue, whether the same be for smoke, air, or any other purpose.

No woodwork shall be within four inches of the back wall of any fireplace.

All spaces between the chimney and the wooden beams shall be solidly filled with mortar, mineral wool, or other incombustible material.

The header beam, carrying the tail beams of the floor and supporting the trimmer arch in front of a fireplace, shall be not less than 20 inches from the chimney breast.

No wooden furring or studding shall be placed against any chimney and any plastering shall be directly on the masonry or on metal lathing.

Woodwork fastened to plaster which is against the masonry of a chimney shall have a layer of at least one-eighth inch thick asbestos board between the woodwork and the plaster.

SECTION 18. Smoke pipes. No smoke pipe shall be within nine inches of any woodwork, or any wooden lath and plaster partition or ceiling.

Where smoke pipes pass through a wooden lath and plaster partition they shall be guarded by galvanized iron ventilating thimbles at least 12 inches larger in diameter than the pipes, or by galvanized iron thimbles built in at least eight inches of brick work or other incombustible material.

No smoke pipe shall pass through any floor or combustible roof of any building.

SECTION 19. Hot air pipes and registers. All heater pipes from hot air furnaces where passing through combustible partitions or floors must be doubled tin pipes w’ith at least one inch air space between them. Horizontal hot air pipes leading from the furnace shall be not less than six inches from any woodwork, unless the woodwork be covered with metal, preserving an air space between the metal and the wood, or the pipe be covered with at least one-half inch of corrugated asbestos, in which latter case the distance from the woodwork may be reduced to not less than three inches.

No hot air pipe shall be placed in a wooden stud partition or any wooden enclosure unless it be at least eight feet horizontal distance from the furnace. Hot air pipes contained in combustible partitions shall be placed inside another pipe arranged to maintain one-half inch air space between the two on all sides or be securely covered with one-half inch of corrugated asbestos. Neither the outer pipe nor the coverings shall be within one inch of wooden studding and no wooden lath shall be used to cover the portion of the partition in which the hot air pipe is located. Hot air pipes in closets shall be doubled with a space of at least one inch between them on all sides.

Every hot air furnace shall have at least one register without register or louvers.

A register located over a brick furnace shall he supported by a brick shaft built up from the cover of the hot air chamber and the shaft shall he lined with a metal pipe. No woodwork shall be within three inches of the outer face of the shaft.

A register box placed in the floor over a portable furnace shall have an open space around it of not less than four inches on all sides and be supported by an incombustible border.

Hot air registers placed in any woodwork or combustible floors shall he surrounded with borders of incombustible material not less than two inches wide, securely set in place.

Register boxes shall be of metal and be double with a space of not less than one inch between the two, or they may be single if covered with asbestos not less than one-eighth inch in thickness, and if all woodwork within two indies be covered with metal.

Cold air ducts for hot air furnaces shall he made of incombustible material.

(To be continued)