FIRE PROTECTION OF DWELLINGS.

FIRE PROTECTION OF DWELLINGS.

In another place in this issue are views of a handsome residence recently destroyed at Jekyl Island, Brunswick, Ga. The illustrations are interesting as showing the progress of a fire from start to finish, and as being a record of similar fires that occur every day in the United States. The pictures point out to fire engineers the constant danger that exists in dwellings on account of the unprotected nature of the property involved. Here was a well-built suburban residence convenient to a large city, but located just so far outside the fire limits that the fire department could not reach it in time to save the building. The question of fire protection in cases of this kind is all important. At fires in wooden buildings quick work is most essential; the first few minutes are the most valuable, as the fire must be controlled in that time to be effective. Isolated buildings of frame construction must be properly equipped with fire extinguishers, and those living on the premises should be drilled to use them with despatch. In accomplishing this lies the principal remedy for stopping incipient fires. The first thing to be looked after in private residences is the removal of all rubbish front cellars and attics, and the placing of fire extinguishers in convenient locations. Even with the rapidity with which motor apparatus may be able to reach the suburbs of a city, the time consumed in making the run may prove fatal in the saving of the property involved. It is, therefore, absolutely necessary that the internal equipment of the building with propr fire extinguishing appliances should be carefully looked after; otherwise the occupants may be taken unawares at any moment. The final loss generally is large in a dwelling house of this kind, especially on account of the valuable paintings, furniture and bric-a-brac which it may contain. In a great many instances these valuabls cannot be replaced, therefore their money value is beyond computation. Fire extinguishers are inexpensive when considered in the light of the damage that may be done at any time by an incipient fire. It is therefore necessary that the owner of the premises make provision for fire protection, as he cannot tell when an accident may happen that would reduce his property to ashes in less than sixty minutes, as was the case with the Brunswick building to which we call attention. Further important attention is directed to this subject by the large number of residences on Long Island, N. Y., recently destroyed by fire, resulting in a loss of over $1,500,000. According to State Fire Marshal Ahcarn most of these Long Island fires were caused by carelessness of workmen engaged in redecorating the houses for the summer season. As one method of meeting this condition it has been proposed that owners exact bonds from decorators or other workmen to indemnify them in case workmen set a place on fire through carelessness.

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