Fire Protection of Salt Lake City.

Fire Protection of Salt Lake City.

Last August Win. H. Glore, who had been attached to the waterworks of Covington, Ky., was appointed chief of the fire department of Salt Lake City, Utah. He made William L. Fitzgerald, of that department, his assistant chief. The fire loss is covered by Chief Glore’s first report for eleven months—from January 1 to December 1, in 1908. During that time there were 305 fires, as against 221 during the same period in 1907. The value of the property involved in 1908 amounted to $3,704,275, in 1907 to was $2,101,755; insurance paid, 1908, $25,185.20, 1907, $46,138.00; actual loss, 1908, $34,459.78, 1907, $57,427.(9); losses over insurance. 1908. $9,274.50, 1907, $11,289.54. A large sum of money has recently been paid out in improving the city’s tire department, so as to keep pace with the growth of the city. The valuation of the new buildings has been such in the past two years as greatly to increase the risk> which the fire department looks after. The additional risk in the value of buildings is about $8,000,000. 1 here are also considerable risks in the increased valuations of contents of the new buildings. For their protection, at the rate of having one fireman to every $750,000 of risk. Salt Lake C it should add nine new men to its department. Better equipment should also be provided to meet the necessity of lighting fires in buildings of 4 stories and upwards. Among these betterments should be a water tower, an additional hose wagon, a new firehouse in the southwestern part of the city. These are needed in any case, as, out of the sixty-five men who make up the working force, five must be on duty at every performance in the five theatres of the city, and men may be away at their meals or on leave when alarms are turned in. The fire alarm system, also, should be bettered by removing all the present fire alarm boxes and installing boxes with telephones in them. Data of the past three years show that out of 907 calls for the fire department received only fifty-two of them were from the street boxes. It is understood that the telephone company is to charge the city a high rental for running the fire alarm wires through the conduits under the main streets. Now, with the telephones hired from the telephone company, the calls all coming in ovi r its wires, the city would be saved a large expense. The fire alarm system is such at the present time that to get it into good working order a large amount of new wire will have to be strung and many repairs made. The cost of maintaining the present system is large, as it keeps one man very nearly all the time working on it. Now, with the telephones installed the telephone company would look after the wires and keep them in good shape. Chief Glore adds as another point in favor of having telephones in the boxes on the street, the fact that whoever calls in will be questioned as to how big a lire is in progress and this will greatly reduce the number of false alarms, the dangers of which are only too well known, hi very time the department goes out not only are firemen placed in danger, but also citizens in the streets at the time. The fire wagons are driven rapidly and thus much danger is occasioned. The city should also purchase 5,000 ft. of new hose for emergencies.

CHIEF WM. H. GLORE, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.

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