Fire Protection of the Tallest Building in the World.

Fire Protection of the Tallest Building in the World.

It is now known that there will be no objection to the sixty-two story building which the Equitable Life Assurance company proposes to construct on the site where its present office structure now stands, on Broadway, between Pine and Cedar streets. As the proposed giant skyscraper would exceed anything that had come under the supervision of the New York building department, the plans had been referred to James P. Whiskeman, of Cornell university; Max Feldman, a Columbia School of Mines graduate, both of Chief Engineer Roth’s division, and to William J. Dolan, of the department’s sanitary engineers. The architects, 1). H. Burnham & Co., of Chicago, sent here an architect and a sanitary engineer to confer w’ith the department experts. To meet improvements suggested by the examiners twelve additional drawings were submitted by the Chicago men. Then the plans were approved, with the agreement that the wind-bracing of the lofty structure shall be greater than at first provided, that additional staircases shall be installed and that each double line of stairs shall be enclosed in fireproof partitions fitted with iron doors. The additional stairs, partitions and doors will take the place of outside fire escapes. The structure will cover the entire block bounded by Broadway, Pine, Cedar and Nassau streets. Its floors will be in the segmental fireproof arch pattern of steel and iron, filled with concrete and other fireproofing. ‘1 he walls will be thicker than proposed in the original plans. An auxiliary fire apparatus will provide standpipes from cellar to roof, with exterior Siamese connections. Each floor will have a line of hose with nozzles, wrenches, fire axes and fire-fighting apparatus readily accessible. At least one elevator will be kept in readiness for the use of firemen both night and day. A separate water supply plant will connect with the standpipes, so that use of the fire hose will not affect the regular water supply, which will come from city mains. It will be stored in two steel tanks, each 10 feet high and 13 feet in diameter, one on the thirty-fourth floor and one on the roof. An auxiliary filtering plant will purify all water for tenants. The plumbing plant will be the largest in the world. It will provide nine large house sewers, nine house drains, six lines of soil pipes, twentyfour lines of waste pipes with sewage ejectors, twentv-eight lines of vent pipes, seven separate inletfor fresh air—literally miles of piping.

The city council at Charleston, S. C.. has deckled to continue the water tests for about two months longer.

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