Fire Record of Newark

Fire Record of Newark

In the Newark, N. J., report of fires for 1912, the following figures are given: The number of alarms received was 282 more than in 1911 and the total fire loss, as estimated by Chief Paul Moore, was $151,642.81 less than in the preceding year. The total number of calls for the year was 1,477, exclusive of 105 false alarms and extra calls. The estimated loss for the year was $881,675, against $833,317.81 during 1911, when the total number of alarms was 1,300. There were only three four-alarm fires during the year, five third alarms and 18 second alarms. Still alarms numbered 349 and calls from regular fire stations totaled 1,128. February was the high month in the number of alarms, having 192, but the total damage was only $63,000, while in January the loss amounted to $239,500, the largest for any month, with 187 alarms. The estimated loss for the other’months of the year was: February, $63,000: March. $27,650: Anril. $14,850; May, $6,575; June, $63,750; July, $24,000: August, $13,500; September. $67.000; October. $23,850; November, $77,000, and December. $61,000. The time spent by all the truck and engine companies in fighting fires during the year totaled 53 davs. two hours and 26 minutes. There were 5,831 lengths of hose used, an aggregate of 291.550 feet or 505 1/2 miles. The number of ladders raised was 761, a total length of 15,798 feet. In the bureau of combustibles and fire risks the records go into detail as to causes of fire, kind of buildings damaged, persons injured and kindred subjects which are made the basis for study in fire prevention regulations. Attention in this department during the year has been centered upon moving picture theaters, and no fatalities or fires of any size are recorded. This is the first year’s experience with the new garage regulations and the bureau officials are pleased with the condition of these places. The bureau of combustibles shows up more by results that arc negative, according to Captain Gasser, the superintendent There were no Fourth of July accidents or fatalities no department store fires, no moving picture disasters and no garage conflagrations. White the bureau has been seeking to reduce the number of fires and the losses incident thereto, the year’s record shows an increase of more than 10 per cent. in the numher of alarms. This is largely due to the fact that the public is being educated to the prompt sending in of alarms. In factory fires, especially, it was found in nrevious years that employes would fight fires until it was far beyond control and would then summon the department.

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