FIRE REPORTS.

FIRE REPORTS.

Chief Plume in his annual report of the fire department of Cranford, N, J., says that during the past year a fire alarm system with four and one-half miles of wire and five signal boxes has been installed. The expense of construction has been confined to the bare cost of materials; the labor having TURKISH FIRE-WATCH TOWER. been contributed by the members of the department. Six fires occurred in the township during the year. Chief Plume recommends the location of an additional hydrant at Garwood, and the purchase of a chemical engine for use at fires outside the hydrant district. The force consists of one chief and one assistant chief engineer and fifty active members, divided into a hose and a truck company of twenty-five members each. The apparatus consists of one four-wheeled hose carriage, equipped with 1,450 feet of two and one-half inch hose, and one hook and ladder truck, equipped with five ladders, extinguishers, hooks, axes, bars, buckets, etc. The water supply is obtained from forty hydrants, located in the most thickly settled portions of the township.

TURKISH FIRE-WATCH TOWER.TURKISH FIREMEN AND APPARATUS.

At North Adams, Mass., during the past year there were nineteen alarms; valuation of real estate, $ 32,500; damage to same, $2,727.50; insurance upon same, $20,175;. value of personal property. $5,740; damage to same, $1,812; insurance upon same, $3,490; total value. $38,240; total damage. $4:539-50; total insurance. $23,665. The force of the department consists of one chief engineer, W W. Byars, and three assistant engineers, three hose companies 9f twelve men each, one hook and ladder company of nine men. Fire Chief Charles E. Swingley, of the St. Louis fire department, reports that, during the year ending April 1. 1897, the department responded to 1,536 alarms. The property loss is given at $1,385,168; the insurance loss at $1,346,817. showing that St. Louis keeps well insured. The per capita loss is $2.16. There are thirty-five engines in active service, one chemical, thirty-five hose wagons, eleven equipped with chemical tanks and eight with spools and chemical tanks, eleven hook and ladder trucks, two water towers, nine fuel wagons,and eleven officers’ wagons. During the year thirlyfour members were injured. The system of inspections inaugurated two years ago has proven of gfeat value. There were 5,974 buildings inspected during the year. Chief Swingley recommends an additional engine and truck house and the addition of two new men to each of the present companies of ten men.

FIRE REPORTS.

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FIRE REPORTS.

Bucyrus, Ohio, had fifteen fire alarms during 1896, of which three were practice alarms. The total fire loss amounted to $1,328.50; insurance, $918.50. The expense of running the department, which consists of Chief Mader, assistant chief engineer, four paid permanent men, thirteen minute men, and two substitutes, was $4,356.73. The town has eighteen fire cisterns, three wells,and 101 hydrants. The apparatus consists of one steam fire engine, two chemical extinguishers,two hook and ladder trucks, two hose carriages, one hose wagon, 2,000 feet of good rubber hose. 1,000 feet of serviceable cotton hose, and 300 feet inferior.

New Bedford, Mass., has a first class fire department under a first-class chief, Frederick Macy, who this year sends in his twentieth annual report. Under him are four assistants, one clerk,thirty-five permanent men,179 call men. The apparatus Consists of eight steam fire engines, one hand engine,two twowheeled hose reels, seven hose wagons, one combination chemical, three Hayes aerial trucks in commission (one Ryan in reserve), nine exercise and coal wagons and one telegraph wagon,and 18 000 feet of two and one half-inch cotton,rubberlined hose. There are 670 fire hydrants and twenty-eight reserve reservoirs. There are eighty-five fire alarm boxes, twenty.seven private,forty miles of wire—117,000 feet buried. The loss by fire for the year ending December 31, 1896, was $78,909.83. Amount of insurance,$705,800. Number of bell alarms, forty seven; still and telephone alarms, ninety seven— total, 144.

Louisville,Ky,, as Chief Hughes reports, had 683 alarms of fire during 1896—sixteen being second alarms, and five, third. The total loss was $437,351.50; insurance loss, $436,679.55, There were two fatal accidents to firemen while on duty. The fire alarm telegraph needs a complete overhauling, and more hydrants and fire cisterns are needed to keep pace with the growth of the city.

In his annual report of the fire department of Dayton,Ohio, Chief Larkin gives as the losses, $31.971.83—the lowest reached in several years—insurance. $29,922.83. The total number of alarms was 270. The department’s total uniformed force consists of sixty-nine men (three substitutes and six call men). Its apparatus consists of four steam fire engines, thirteen hose wagons, one Hayes extension ladder, two two-hose ladder trucks, two chemical engines, two telegraph wagons, three buggies. There are ninety-six miles of fire alarm wire on poles, 118 fire alarm boxes—at least fifty more absolutely needed—and apparatus,bringing the total value of the fire alarm telegraph system up to $33,800. There are 1.030 fire hydrants and eight fire cisterns. An aerial truck with eighty-five foot extension ladder should be added to the apparatus.

The Skandia Manufacturing Company’s large two-storied frame building at Rockford, Ill., completely destroyed by fire and the adjoining union factory badly damaged. The Skandia building was well alight before the fire department arrived; but the good work of the men prevented the flames from spreading any further.