FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS.

FIRES AND EXPLOSIONS.

Europe has been the scene of two catastrophes, in which fire played a prominent part. The worst in every way was at Funfkirchen, capital of the county of Baranya, Hungary, where, on July 30, a powder magazine exploded with a terrific shock accompanied with a fearful loss of life. The town hall was almost completely wrecked and other buildings in the vicinity were badly damaged. Many persons were killed, and more than a hundred were injured. It is thought that a large proportion of them will die. Some of the buildings in the vicinity of the magazine collapsed under the effects of the shock, and it is thought many of their inmates were buried in the ruins. The magazine was located but a short distance from the square in which the market is held. It was market day and the square was crowded with rustics when the explosi on occurred. Among the injured were many of these country people.

The other disaster, which happened on the same day off the coast of Italy was unaccompanied with fatal results, though it caused the loss of the Italian coast defence warship Roma. During the thunder storm lightning struck the ship and set fire to her. The flames spread rapidly, in spite of the efforts of the crew to subdue them, and her commander,seeing that they were approaching the powder magazine, gave orders to attach a torpedo to the hull of the vessel and then for all hands to abandon the ship, When the small boats containing the crew were at a safe distance the torpedo was discharged, tearing a great hole in the hull, and causing the Roraa to sink quickly. Nobody was hurt. The Roma was a central battery, wooden, single screw, bark rigged vessel of 5.370 tons. She was 261 feet and 4 inches long, 57 feet 4 inches beam, and 24 feet 1 inch mean draught of water. She was built at Genoa in 1865. Her engines were of 2,819 indicated horse power, and she had a speed of thirteen knots. Her armament consisted of thirtyone large and magazine guns.

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