Fires in Toronto.

Fires in Toronto.

The number of alarms answered in Toronto, Out., in 1908, was 975, as against 1,061 in 1907. The loss last year was $1,076,221, as against $1,107,542 in the year preceding. The number of alarms in each of the last two years was the greatest for one year in the history of the department. The total loss by fire was $1,076,221.73—$31,320.73 less than in 1907, but considerably above the average, because of five big fires, where the aggregate damage amounted to over $600,000. The loss on buildings was $270,072.13, insured for $2,372,000; loss on contents, $806,189.85; insured for $1,847,983: total loss on buildings and contents, $1,076,221.98: total insurance on buildings and contents, $4,220,083; insurance paid on buildings, $264,747.13: insurance paid on contents, $733,628.85: total insurance paid on buildings and contents, $998,375.98; loss over insurance paid on buildings and contents, $44,195; loss on buildings not insured, $3,835: loss on contents not insured, $29,816. During the year eleven citizens received serious injury by or on account of fire—five proving fatal—two from explosion: one by being run over by apparatus; two from burns. Chief John Thompson’s report says that the completion of the new central fire hall on Adelaide street was the most important improvement in the year. “The rapid building up in the city and the annexing of outlying districts (the report continues) require at as early a date as possible the erection of four more stations—one in East Toronto; one in the Avenue road district: one in the neighborhood of Dupont and Bathurst streets: and one in the factory district west of Ossington avenue station.” These stations will necessitate the purchase of four new hose wagons, at least one hook and ladder truck, and two steam fire engines. One engine should be secured at once to replace No. 1 engine at No. 13 station, Dundas street. Three of the new hose wagons should he large, rubber-tired wagons capable of carrying large quantities of hose and be placed in the central station. There are ninety-four horses in service—an increase of six over 1907. Chief Thompson reports that it will cost $1,500 a year to give East Toronto fire protection pending the establishment of a fire hall and permanent service. The services of the volunteer brigade will be continued there for a year at least.

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