FIREWORKS MAKING AND ITS RISKS.

FIREWORKS MAKING AND ITS RISKS.

The making of fireworks involves, roughly, three processes: Making the cases, the paper tubes and shells; combining the materials which give the power and light and color of the fireworks, and putting the explosive and illuminating material into cases, which completes the making of the pyrotechnics. One of the simplest of all fireworks is the Roman candle, yet it is one of the most dangerous in the making. The row of smallest buildings in the fireworks village, a line of tiny shanties not more than ten feet square, is on the outer edge of the odd collection of houses. There is room in each for only one man to work at a time. He stands facing a small window with a door behind him. On his right is a shelf haded with powder and other inflammatory substances which are the component parts of the candle. On his left are the empty tubes of hard stiff paper and the shells for the candles. In front of him is the deadly machine at which he works. An interesting rule to prevent disaster is this: When an employe enters the building in which he is employed, he must remain there until the day’s work is finished at night. Employes are not permitted to leave the little houses even for lunch, and by no means to meet each other or to congregate during working hours. Each man and woman working among explosives brings a lunch and cats it in the building where he or she works. Employes are not permitted to meet until the day’s work is over and they have changed their clothes, removing those which may have on them the dust of dangerous chemicals. It is feared that one person might receive from the garments of another a bit of chemical, phosphorus, for instance, which, when it comes in contact with certain other substances, causes combustion at once.

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