Five Alarm Fire in Brooklyn.

Five Alarm Fire in Brooklyn.

There was a burst of flame and smoke a few nights ago from the boiler room of the factory of S. Barrett & Co., manufacturers of tar paper, roofing and paving bricks, at Smith street and Gowanus Canal. Brooklyn, and before the engines arrived several factories in that section of the city were in danger. Across Smith street from the main plant, a two-story structure was a two-story building used by Barrett & Co., as a storehouse and drying rooms. The wind fanned the flames over to the buillding and soon it was burning furiously. Policeman John Wagner and John Regan, a night watchman, tried to get into the boiler room, but were driven back by the fire and the men began to free fifty horses in a stable adjoining the plant. The first alarm brought Deputy Chief Tally. The fire was becoming dangerous. There was a rain of sparks on neighboring factories and even factories on the further side of the canal. Tally sent in a second, then a third and then a fourth alarm. Chief Kenlon arrived in response to the last, and he sent in a fifth call, which called out all the fire engines in the south section of Brooklyn. In the short time that it took the first engines to teach the place the fire broke out through the toot of the building. Besides extra engines and trucks, the fireboats Seth Low. Zopher Mills, and the New Yorker responded. Flames were leaping high above the roof of the building, and, caught by the high wind, were being swept across Halleck Street to the offices of the Commonwealth Roof Company in a four-story building and across Smith Street to the two-story building of the S T Bowne Company, dealers in hay and feed. The firemen gained the roof of the Commonwealth Company’s building, and. lighting the fire against the wind from there, managed to keep the Commonwealth Building from catching fire. The fire reached the hay and feed building, however, and presently this, too. was a mass of flame. There was something the matter with the water pressure and the firemen had difficulty in sending streams into the inner recesses of the factories, both of which are very deep. It was several hours after the start of the blaze before Chief Kenlon pronounced it under control. Then the rear wall of i, e Bowne building had fallen in and the Barrett building had been wrecked. The damage is estimated at $300,000. How the fire started is not known. The accompanying photograph was taken for this journal.

Benjamin C. Smith, a retired manufacturer of plumbers’ supplies, died at his home, 120 St. Mark’s avenue, Brooklyn, on February 24th, after a long illness. He was born in New York July 4, 1845, and had lived in Brooklyn for thirtythree years. He was the father of the late Fred A. Smith, whose death was recently recorded in this journal. He is survived by a widow and two sons, Eugene and Walter, and a daughter, Mar garet.

GENERAL VIEW OE RUINS OF THE BIG FACTORY IN EMERSON PLACE. BROOKLYN.VIEW SHOWING DESTRUCTION OF UPPER FLOOR AND WATER TANK STILL STANDING.

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