Flint to Have Large Storage Reservoir

Flint to Have Large Storage Reservoir

According to a report submitted by Col. George A. Johnson, consulting engineer, dated February 21, the city of Flint, Mich., should a low water period similar to that experienced in 1911 recur, would be in danger of a serious water famine. In order to avoid this possibility Col. Johnson has made the following recommendations in his report:

“In 1950 the present population of 130,000 will have increased to 300,000 and the present 13.5-m. g. d. consumption to 37.2-m. g. d. No other source than the Flint River is worth consideration but as at present utilized it is not adequate. With a storage reservoir of 1,856 m. g. capacity above Genesee, formed by a concrete dam with its crest 26 ft. above the river bed, sufficient water may be impounded to provide during a protracted drought for 368, 140, 81 and 55 days, respectively, in 1930, 1940, 1950 and 1960. On the catchment area of Flint River there is a population of 38 persons per square mile. The reservoir planned will be shallow but the anticipated algal growths can be controlled by copper sulphate. Ripple aeration at the dam will offset the effects of stagnation of the stored water and the existing filter plant will remove satisfactorily the reduced suspended matter, color and bacteria at lower cost for chemical costs than now.”

According to Col. Johnson the cost of the dam including purchase and clearing of flooded area will be about $1,250,000, the structure being 1800 feet long. He recommends immediate action, as the plans cannot be prepared for the letting of the contracts before next August and this would hardly complete the work in time to benefit from the flood water of 1925. This would make 1926 the earliest date that the storage reservoir would be of any use to the city. Col. Johnson’s investigation and consequent report was made through the suggestion of F. N. Baldwin, chief engineer and general superintendent of the water works of Flint.

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