FORT WORTH, TEX., FIRE AND WATER DEPARTMENTS,

FORT WORTH, TEX., FIRE AND WATER DEPARTMENTS,

The reports of the departments of Fort Worth, Tex., show that this rising and growing [young city well deserves the title of the “Hub of Texas.” It is a great railroad centre, and is thoroughly up to date in all that goes to make up a city of the first class. With a population of 55,000, and a fire area of 3,200 acres, it abounds in splendid business and residential buildings, it has for their protection 2 steam fire engines; 1 chemical engine on wheels; 8 chemical extinguishers; 1 uerial truck; 1 hook and ladder truck; 6 hose carriages of all kinds; 1 hose wagon; a good supply of rubber and cotton hose; 23 horses, valued at $4,500; its whole fire equipment, including the Gamewell fire alarm system, with 55 street and 4 special boxes, being valued at $51,000, with buildings occupied, valued at $25,000. Its manual force consists of 1 chief, with assistant, 33 men paid all the time, 3 part, with 52 volunteers. The total annual expense of maintaining the department is $25,000. The water works plant is very fine, and cost $800,000. The water source is 3 artesian wells and the Trinity river; the system, pumping to standpipe; capacity, 3,000,000 gallons; 2 8,000,000 gullon vertical triple expansion pumping engines, equal to any in the United States; 45 hydrants, 51 miles of water mains, 6-inch to 36-inch, Chattanooga; 626 valves; 75 meters, 52 Crown, 13 Hersey, 10 Buffalo; 2,050 taps. Pressure, domestic,85 pounds, fire, 120. The works are owned by the city. There are besides 43 miles of sewers; 85 miles of graded and graveled streets. The city also owns a fine electric plant, having 23 miles of pole lines, 400 incandescent and 65 arc lumps, used for street lighting only. Altogether, Fort Worth comes well to the front, and can more than hold its own with any city of its size on the American continent.

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