Foul Water Tanks.

Foul Water Tanks.

The commissioner of health would do well to investigate the condition of the water supply in particular buildings (says the Real Estate News, of Chicago). There are several sources of danger in connection with the water-storage tanks which are erected on the roofs of hundreds of buildings throughout the city. Many of these tanks are imperfectly covered, so that dirt and filth of all kinds get into the drinking water. Worse still, as the water supply is usually drawn through an orifice some inches above the bottom of the tank, the sediment remains undisturbed for years at a stretch. The same argument holds against the tanks so commonly attached to ordinary kitchen ranges. The water enters from the top and flows out about a foot above the bottom, and, in most cases, no w-ay whatever is provided for cleansing. Water taken directly front the mains is much cleaner than water taken from roof-tanks. The commissioner of health should regulate these appliances, and the council should see to it that he has adequate power so to do. Each tank might easily be provided with a vent at the bottom, through which it should be thoroughly flushed at frequent intervals. Hotwater tanks in houses could be equiped at small expense with faucets, which would enable any competent cook or housekeeper to keep them clean.

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