Frozen Hydrants in St. Louis.

Frozen Hydrants in St. Louis.

The burning of the Weyl Bakery and Cafe building North 6th Street, St. Louis, Mo., caused a loss of $25,000. The structure was located in the east central part of the city, covering 25×25 feet. It is six stories high with brick sidings and stone front, but without partition walls. No one was able to say where or by what cause the fire started. It was discovered by the night watchman about 1:54 a. m., and was stopped on the third floor after burning for 12 hours. Five alarms were sent in from box 1228 and responded to by 15 engines, five trucks, two water towers and six fuel wagons. Upon the arrival of the firemen the blaze had already reached the top floor and burst through the window, extending half way across the street. The weather at the time was very cold, and several hydrants were found frozen, which hindered immediate attack on the flames. A sufficient number of six-inch hydrants were near, which enabled the use of 3,000 feet of hose with 1 3/4 and 1 3/4-inch nozzles, aside from deluge sets. The streets are sixty feet wide and carry a thirty-six inch water main, and with a 35 pound hydrant pressure, 20 engine streams were maintained from the start. The building was valued at .$50,000, upon which there was a loss of $20,000, and the contents was valued at $10,000, the loss being about half that sum. The contents consisted of bakery goods and fixtures. The Columbia Building adjoining the Weyl Bakery was was afire at one time, but the flames were extinguished before any material loss was sustained.

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