FUNERAL OF CHIEF MARJENHOFF.

FUNERAL OF CHIEF MARJENHOFF.

The late Chief Marjenhoff, whose sudden death occurred on December 27, was buried from St. Matthew’s Lutheran church on the following Sunday. The church was crowded and the service was conducted by the Rev, Dr. Mueller, the pastor, who, with the Rev. Dr. Scherer, of St. Andrew’s church, met the body at the door. The casket was carried by the active pallbearers, seven of the foremen of the city’s fire department, the department attending as a body. The senior pallhearers were: F. F A. Wieters; George Ltmz; L. Cantwell; C. R. Valk; Henry Schachte; and E. H. Jahnz. Charles Pequette, who had for years acted as driver for Chief Marjenhoff, was on the hearse. The floral tributes, sent by friends and organisations, were very numerous and very beautiful. A ladder, ten feet high, of white roses bore pn the seven steps the numbers of the engine companies. A pair of pompier ladders, in white flowers. a call-box, with the words “His Last Call, 131,” a fireman’s trumpet, a fireman’s axe, a pillow, a star and several conventional designs, all in natural flowers, were among the special pieces— these in addition to the bouquets and wreaths of roses and carnations on the casket. Among those present were Mayor Rhctt and many of the al dernten and representatives of various military, civil and fraternal organisations of which the dead chief was a member during his lifetime. The sound of the fire bells as they tolled outside mingled with the hymns of the choir and the strains of the organ, and, on the conclusion of the funeral service, the body was borne to the cemetery and there laid to rest. In the course of his address Dr. Mueller said: “By day and by night, in the heat of summer and the chill of winter; thinking not of personal comfort or danger, or of personal aims and intentions, our beloved chief of the Charleston fire department was ready and quick to respond to the call, and with the best of his manhood waged the war against the common enemy, fire.” Among the many other tributes to the memory of the deceased chief was one from James D. McNeill, president of the National Firemen’s association, who was unable to attend the funeral. He said of Chief Marjenhoff that he was an “exceptionally able man, noted for his high conception of duty and loyalty to his profession. Generous, warm-hearted and level-headed, lie was a man who made friends and retained their friendship by the force of his personal character and integrity. Such men are, and always will be sadly missed.” Chief Marjenhoff was born in Bremen, Germany, on September 6, 1845. His father was a brewer in that city’. The boy left Germany for the United States when he was fourteen years old, with the intention of going to the California goldfields. but stayed in South Carolina, where he learned the baker’s trade, returning to Charleston in the spring of 1861, when he enlisted in company B of the German artillery and served through the Civil war, at the conclusion of which, being penniless. he began life again as a baker and in 1868 started as a master baker. In 1865 he became a volunteer fireman in the German fire companv. in which he filled every office, but declined an election as president. Upon the organisation of the paid department in January. 1882, he was elected foreman of engine company No. 1—his old German company. He resigned in February. 1885, but, as he dearly loved the work, he kept himself thoroughly posted on methods of fighting the flames through the various fire journals. In Januarv. 1804, after a great fire, he was again in a position to offer his services to the city, and was elected chief of the department. Chief Marienhoff was a member of the International Association of Fire Engineers, at one time bolduur the office of first vicepresident. He was offered the presidency, but declined the honor. Francis S. Rodgers, for twenty years chairman of the board of fire masters, in speaking of the death of Chief Marjenhoff, said : “He had no superior as a firefighter in this country. I never saw a better nor a truer man. He was an ideal leader for the firemen and appeared to be born so. Otto Marjenhoff’s whole lieart and soul were in the work. He managed the department with all the skill and ability necessary. Nothing was left undone by him that would add to its efficiency. Nothing too good can be said about noble Otto Marjenhoff.” Assistant Chief Louis Behrens holds the position of acting chief until the successor of Chief Marjenhoff is elected. Foreman Halsall, of engine No. 6. has been appointed acting assistant chief.

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