Gale and Dense Smoke Hinder the Department at Cadillac Fire

Gale and Dense Smoke Hinder the Department at Cadillac Fire

The Cadillac, Mich., department was obliged to contend against a 70-mile gale and dense smoke in fighting a fire at the Cadillac Chemical Company’s plant in the outskirts of the city a short time ago. The fire originated in the company’s yard from hot charcoal, and spread rapidly to the retort house, a one and a half story brick and wood building, which was erected about ten years ago. The alarm was at 11.50 a. m. The department on its arrival found the yard was ablaze and the high wind was blowing the flames toward the retort house. Under Chief J. T. Maxwell’s skillful guidance the members of the department fought the flames with remarkable success, considering the adverse conditions under which they were working. The department succeeded in stopping the fire at the retort house, within about 200 feet of 15,000 cords of wood, and about 350 feet from a lumber yard. The property endangered was valued at $50,000, but to what extent it was damaged was not ascertained. Chief Maxwell had ten streams thrown from the 5,500 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose in service. All of these streams were from 6-inch, double hydrants, six of which were available for use. These hydrants were located 250 feet apart, and at each there was a pressure of 100 pounds. A 6inch main was situated near the scene of the blaze, and the water was supplied through this by means of the direct pumping system. The department had twenty-five men at the fire, and the only apparatus in use were hose wagons. The fire burned for five hours and fifty minutes before it was completely extinguished.

Chief J. T. Maxwell, of Cadillac, Mich.

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