GALLIPOLIS HAS WORST FIRE IN YEARS

GALLIPOLIS HAS WORST FIRE IN YEARS

TEN MINUTES AFTER FIRE BROKE OUT IN THE OHIO VALLEY FURNITURE FACTORY, GALLIPOLIS.

The Gallipolis, Ohio, fire department was called upon to face a hot fire on Tuesday, April 11, when an alarm was turned in at 3:40 p. m. from the Ohio Valley Furniture Company. When the department arrived on the scene of action they found the factory building of the company seemingly afire all over, with the main part of the fire in the rear of the building and in the dry house. The large fans use/1 in conveying the /lust front the factory to the dust pan or room had driven /tense volumes of smoke and flames throughout the entire building, inaking it impossible for the firemen to enter, the result being that so far as this building was concerned the firemen were helpless and the building doomed to destruction. The efforts of the firemen were then directed towards saving the sttrr am/ling buildings. The wind was blowing a ale, and the flames, being fanned by the wind, on destroyed the building, and the walls fell in less than a half hour after the tire started. Fortunately the wind was blowing away from the titer buildings, or the company would have sustained a much greater loss. So rapidly did the Haines gain headway that a majority of the venty men employed in the building at the time compelled to jump from the second and third stories. There were many thrilling escapes, and while no one was fatally hurt, five or six re seriously injured. The building destroyed uas three stories, 100×12*/ feet, and together with the contents was valued at $00,000 and insure/I for $-10,000. While the building was not tireproof, yet it was not a tire-trap by any means, and was well supplied with water pipes, the water coming from the city mains giving an elegant pressure. The factory was well supplied with hose, which was well distributed throughout the building, and these were used when the fire tarted by the employes, hut of no avail. The re department was handicapped in two ways— first, there was a delay in sending in the alarm, the employes endeavoring to extinguish the dailies themselves; and second, there was only one hydrant located within reasonable distance of the building. Two other hydrants were used, hut it required long lines of hose to he laid. I5y the use of Siameses four lines were taken off the nearest hydrant and sufficient pressure was maintained, the water pressure being 113 pounds gravity ami lod with the pumps running. Over three thousand feet of hose were used, mostly double cotton jacket, and eleven hundred and fifty feet brand new These were divided into seven streams, with nozzles varying in size from ⅝ inch to 1 ¾ inches and one Kastman set. Approximately 900,000 gallons of water were used, and the department was in service twenty-five hours. Firemen McGath and Gills were working in the rear of the building with a line of hose when the wind changed suddenly and they had a narrow escape. They were compelled to abandon the hose and two new sections of Paragon brand Eureka lire hose and a I arkin shut-ofT nozzle and play pipe were burned. The tire alarm whistle, which was located on this building, was destroyed, and the city will be out of a lire alarm until a new one can be purchased. The lire department consists of ten part-paid men, chief and full-paid driver, also ten volunteer firemen. This is the largest fire Gallipolis has had for several years, and the first alarm for the year 1911. The accompanying photographs show the condition of the building at the time the department arrived and ten minutes after it arrived.

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