George Westinghouse

George Westinghouse

George Westinghouse the famous inventor and engineer died of heart disease at his New York City residence on Thursday. March 12. His health had been failing for some time and consequently his death, though a great shock to his thousands of friends and acquaintances all over the country, was nevertheless in a measure anticipated. The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, from the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York City. The mental alertness and wonderful vitality that had so characterized his brilliant career remained with him to the end. Although actively associated with a large number of industries, he had during the last few years begun to transfer his responsibilities to the shoulders of his trusted lieutenants, the fortunate selection of which has always been one of the leading characteristics of his varied career. His demise therefore will not cause any material change in the policy or operation of the companies so indelibly linked with the name Westinghouse. George Westinghouse was born at Central Brirge, Schoharie County, N. Y., on the 6th of October, 1846. The boy attended the public and high schools of the town, spending much of his leisure time, after studies, in his father’s machine shop. Before he was fifteen he invented and made a rotary engine, and passed at an early age the examination for the position of Assistant Engineer in the United States Navy. In June, 1863, though barely seventeen, he enlisted in the Twelfth New York National Guard, and was discharged at the expiration of November of the same year, when he joined the Sixteenth New York Cavalry, being chosen corporal. He was honorably discharged in November of the following year, and a month later accepted an appointment as Third Assistant Engineer, United States Navy. He entered Union College, where he remained until the close of his sophomore year, and, obedient to his impulse toward experiment, abandoned his classical studies and entered upon active life, to find a wider scope for his inventive genius. Going to Troy, N. Y„ one day, a delay caused by a collision between two freight trains suggested to Mr. Westinghouse the idea that a brake under the control of an engineer might have prevented the accident. The inventor began to think over the matter, and, after much further study and investigation, the use of compressed air impressed itself on him. The first patent was issued April 13, 1869, and the Westinghouse Air Brake Company was formed on the 20th of July following. The Westinghouse Companies employ 50,000 men on whom 150,000 persons are dependent. The total capitalization of all the companies is $200,000,000. Mr. Westinghouse was married August 8th, 1867, at Brooklyn, N. Y., to Marguerite Franklin Walker. They had one son, George, who is a graduate of Yale, and was recently married to the Honorable Evelyn Violet Brocklebank. His wife and son survive him.

GEORGE WESTINGHOUSE.

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