GIFTS TO AMERICAN ENGINEERING SOCIETIES.

GIFTS TO AMERICAN ENGINEERING SOCIETIES.

The splendid new buildings at Pittsburg, given by Andrew Carnegie for technical instruction and the use of engineering societies, represent an enormous outlay of money. New York has not been forgotten by Mr. Carnegie, as is shown by the splendid new building at 29 to 39 West Thirtyninth street, Manhattan, which he has just erected at a cost of $1,500,000, to serve as a headquarters for such of the engineering societies of the United States as are domiciled in New York city. The seventh and eighth floors of the building have been reserved for the associate societies that have engineering or some department of cience as their principal object. For these organisations the building affords office areas of varying size, from one room up, with the common facilities of the lecturerooms, library and other accessories. Among these societies may be enumerated the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, the Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers, the National Electric Light association, the Society of Chemical Engineers, the New York Electrical society, the Association of Edison Illuminating companies and the American Street and Interurban Railroad association. Each of the three founder societies occupies a floor laid out in accordance with its own plans, and these are all devoted to administrative and executive work, and the libraries of the three societies have been concentrated on the top two floors of the building. In these will also be placed whatever other collections of engineering literature may be added in the future. Mr. Carnegie especially stipulated that the money he gave should go into the buildings, and that the societies should provide the land. At that time the kindred Engineers’ club, a purely social organisation, had already secured land for its new house in West Fortieth street, opposite Bryant park and the Public library—a site that appealed strongly to Mr. Carnegie, who thereupon, having, as a member, made the club participant in the endowment, offered to finance the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Institute of Mining Engineers in obtaining the land they needed in West Thirtyninth street, at a cost of $502,000. Thus provision was made at the outset for two separate buildings, back to back, one devoted to the technical and professional side of engineering and the other to the human and social side. As the land for the club building cost about $220,000, it will be seen that not less than $2,225,000 was thus set aside for the creation of a new engineering centre such as has never been seen before. In addition to the Engineering Societies’ building, $1,050,000 was appropriated out of the gift and $450,000 went to the club, which has added $150,000 of its own equipment, etc. The movable property and expenditures of the three founder engineering bodies represent at least $100,000. so that the two structures as they stand have taken $2,000,000 in all. Before this, George Westinghouse and his companies had given $50,000; the General Electric company, $25,000; its officials nearly as much more; the Bell Telephone companies, $25,000; T. A. Edison, $5,000; the Allis-Chalmers company, $3,500; and Clarence H. Mackay, $5,000— about $150,000 in all. The dedicatory exercises were held on April 16-19 in the main auditorium. The principal features of the first day of these exercises were the receptions of the members and ladies by Dr. Samuel Sheldon, president of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, and Mrs. Sheldon, Dr. Frederick Remson Hutton, president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and Mrs. Hutton, Dr. John Hays Hammond, president of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, and Mrs. Hammond, Mr. E. E. Olcott, president of the United Engineering society, and Mrs. Olcott, Mr. John W. Lieb, jr., chairman of the reception committee, and Mrs. Lieb; after a prayer b – Chaplain Edward Everett, the reading of communications from the President of the United States, the President of the Republic of Mexico, and Earl Grey, the governor-general of Canada; the acceptance of the keys of the building by E. E. Olcott, president of the United Engineering society; and an oration by Arthur Twining Hadley, president of Yale University, on “The professional ideals of the Twentieth Ceil tury.” Mr. Carnegie also spoke a few words The officers and councils of the societies received in the rooms of the respective organisations. The second dedicatory exercises were held on the next day, and addresses were delivered by the president of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the president of the American Institute of Mining Engineers. Greet ings and felicitations from foreign and national scientific societies and institutions of learning were also read. The John Fritz medal, awarded to Alexander Graham Bell, and medals for distinguished services were also presented. The remaining meetings were devoted to professional sessions of the several societies, beginning with a meeting of the American Institute of Mining Engineers on the third day, when Mr. H. T. Hildage read a paper on “Mining engineering opera tions in New York city and vicinity,” d.’scrihi 1 the excavation and tunnel work now under con struction by the transportation companies. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers held a session in the evening, when there was an address by William Crozier, brigadier general, chief of ordnance, U. S. A., on “The Ordnance Department as an engineering organisation.” The last day was devoted to the reading and discussion of professional papers by the American Institute of Mining Engineers. The functions of the week terminated with an informal smoker and vaudeville for the members of the founder societies in the evening in the concert hall of Madison Square Garden.

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