GIGANTIC COLUMNS.

GIGANTIC COLUMNS.

The eight great pillars for the Episcopal cathedral of St. John the Divine, Manhattan, New York, have been completed, shipped to this city, and are now being transported from the dock to Cathedral Heights. Each is a memorial gift, and each one cost $25,000. An enormous lathe was built to turn these columns, which were intended to be monoliths. Unfortunately, however, they broke in the lathe while being polished, one within a few hours of comple tion. They are, therefore, made in two pieces, the larger section of which is thirty-seven feet six inches in length by six feet in diameter, and weighs ninety tons. The smaller section is seventeen feet long, five feet in diameter at the smaller end, and weighs from forty to forty-five tons. They are of Fox Island, Me., granite, and were transported, two columns at one time, on the deck of a lighter, the smaller portions being stowed away in the hold. They were easily removed from the lighter by a “timber hitch” —a rope rove round each of the larger sections of the columns and unwound by a powerful engine, a rotary motion being imparted to the columns as the rope left them. To transport them to the cathedral grounds, one of the largest trucks ever constructed was built, with a ten-ton frame, thirty feet long, its timbers being one foot two inches by one foot; the large wheels four feet three inchs in diameter; the small, two feet eleven inches; axles of cold-rolled steel, seven and eight inches square and eight feet six inches long; wheels built up of seven thicknesses of three-inch white oak plank, with four five-inch tires on each. A forty-horsepower traction engine was used in transporting the columns, although it did not do the actual moving. A “deadman” as employed by house movers was made by removing some of the paving blocks, and a powerful hoisting engine (as will be seen in the accompanying illustration, reproduced by courtesy of the Scientific American) was connected with the shaft of the truck, receiving its steam from the traction engine through a hose. The column was moved a short distance, and the traction and hoisting engines were then removed to the next anchorage, it took nineteen days to carry the first column to its destination.

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