Glass Factory Damaged by Fire at Pittsburgh

Glass Factory Damaged by Fire at Pittsburgh

Fire recently broke out at the factory of the J. T. & A. Hamilton Glass Company, of Pittsburgh, Pa., and burned for over six hours, resulting in $20,000 loss on the buildings and $40,000 on the stock, consisting of glassware, boxes, packing, etc. The plant occupied a space of 150 by 400 feet and consisted of one-and two-story buildings, most of which were constructed of iron clad wood. The buildings were valued at about $250,000 and their contents at $100,000. The flaes spread so rapidly through the plant, that upon the arrival of the department, almost half of the plant was in flames. Despite this start, the tiremen, under the skillful leadership of Chief Richards and District Chief Frank L. P. Kelley, did excellent work, and succeeded in confining the flames to the warehouse and packing departments o tthe plant, where the blaze had originated. Several other buildings in the same block as the glass factory were endangered by the fire, but Chief Richards and Assistant Chief Kelley kept the flames from damaging these structures. During the course of the fire, two firemen sustained light injuries from glass. The blaze started from an unknown cause. Ten hydrants, located from 100 to 200 feet apart, were convenient for use and at these there was a pressure of 85 pounds. Eight engine and two hydrant streams were thrown from the 4,000 feet of hose in service. The hose was equipped with 1and 1 1/4-inch nozzles. Water was supplied by means of the gravity system, from a 48-inch main, located near the scene of the fire There were 70 firemen at the blaze, accompanied by the following apparatus: Three American-La France engines, three Amoskeag engines, three motor hose cars, three hose wagons and two aerial ladder trucks.

Commissioner of Public Works Walter F. Slade, Providence, R. I.

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