Glens Falls Fire Department.

Glens Falls Fire Department.

Chief John Mack, of Glens Falls, N. Y., has given out an interesting and exhaustive report as to the fire department of which he is the efficient head. In it he sums up what the department needs in order to make it in every way adequate to meet the wants of the villages it protects. Four additional fire-alarm boxes are called for; two chemical 35-gal. tanks should be provided, one to he placed in each of the sleighs for use at winter fires. An extra horse and wagon should he provided, as the duties of the department require that the chief and superintendent of the fire-alarm should make frequent visits to all sections of the village. In this way. also, in case of an alarm being turned in while such extra work was being performed, it would obviate the necessity of being ten or twenty minutes late arriving at the scene of a fire. At other times, also, the extra horse could he used in case of one of the regular horses being sick or disabled. Money for hiring a horse on such an emergency would thus he saved. An additional permanent fireman, who should likewise he an expert lineman, is another requirement, as is, too, a more strict observance of the provisions of the various electrical franchises, in so far as they relate the erection rf poles, stringing of wires and electrical wiring in general, for all of which an electrical expert should he employed and clothed with ample authi rity by the village to back up his authority. I11 that way one great source of danger from fire would he avoided. 1 he chief also brings up the necessity of an adequate water supply, to which allusion has already been made The neglect of installing fire-escapes and the perils to human life arising from their absence on business and residential buildings, especially such as have only one long, narrow stairway leading to the street, is also severely censured and the attention of the authorities is earnestly called to it. The chief then treats of the question of just and right compensation to the firemen, which today remains the same as it was several years ago. When writing on this subject Chief Mack takes occasion to point out that, although firemen apparently often have much spare time on their hands, that time hangs heavily on their hands and cannot be devoted to any money-making outside work. They are the slaves of the hell; their work at fires is full of danger; they are obliged to turn out and work in all weathers, at all times of the night or day, whatever the season, and whether the alarm is for a big fire or a mere false alarm. Poor pay stands for the difficulty of obtaining recruits and of retaining the permanent men, and so keeping up an efficient organisation and of compensating the firemen for the sacrifice of home life and its joys. Last but not least come the matters of a proper supply of new hese and new stations, or at least of adequate repairs being made to the existing firehouses. The total loss for the year was $23.592.74—$16,259.44 on buildings: $7,333.35 on contents, with a total amount of insurance on property at risk of $729,575.

Chief John Mack, Glens Falls, N. Y.

The West Bend. Wis., fire department has elected George B. Roden, chief.

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