Good Pressure Prevents Conflagration at Quebec

Good Pressure Prevents Conflagration at Quebec

The fact that the entire business district of Quebec, Que., was not wiped out on March 22nd, when fire destroyed the Renaud provision house, is ascribed due to the excellent water pressure maintained while the fire burned, and the quick response of the firemen, under Chief Philip Hamel. The burned building, which was 125 by 150 feet and two stories high, was constructed of wood with a stone front. Although a watchman was in the building the alarm was turned in by a passerby shortly before 5 a. m., bringing the firemen to the scene in a few minutes. Flames and heavy smoke were pouring out of almost all the windows and some of these were blocked with stock. The firemen had the blaze under control in two hours but it was not entirely extinguished for six hours. Had the fire occurred later in the day there might have been many fatalities as 200 persons were employed in the building. The department had in service three steamers, two motor chemical cars, one combination car, three motor ladder trucks and two two-horse and eight one-horse hose wagons. The steamers were not used, twelve streams being thrown from the five 4-inch double and one 8-inch triple hydrants which are 150 feet apart. The pressure was 65 pounds at the 4-inch hydrants and 85 pounds at the 8-inch. In all, 5,800 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose were used. The loss on the building valued at $30,000 was $10,000 and on the contents valued at $175,000, $50,000.

No posts to display