GOOD SHOWING AT WORCESTER.

GOOD SHOWING AT WORCESTER.

Worcester, Mass., makes a good showing in the line of fire protection. During the year ending November, 1906, the fire-loss was, conparatively small, though the number of alarms responded to (980, of which twenty-two were false) was large. Of the actual fires 467 occurred in wooden buildings and 232 in brick buildings; 281 were other than building fires, Five hundred and fifty-eight fires required the use of apparatus to extinguish them—449 with the use of chemicals, and 109 with water. Kighty per cent, of the tires requiring the use of apparatus were handled with chemicals. Among the causes of the greater number of tires were the following: Brush and grass, 152; chimney, 134; oil stove and lamps, fifty-five; children and matches, fifty-three; spark from parlor matches, forty-six; lightning, forty-five; electrical wire, twenty-six; supposed incendiary, twenty-one; hot ashes, fourteen; draperies ignited from gas jet, ten; spontaneous combustion. nine; thawing pipes, six; fireworks, three; using greasy cloth to wipe stove, three. The value of property where fires occurred was $6,940,663.00; insurance, $4,907,874.55; insurance paid. $124,758.01; loss, no insurance, $18,678.66.

Total loss, $143,436.67. The number of fires was nine tier cent, above the average for the previous five years, and the loss was twentyseven tier cent. less. The loss, as compared to the property involved where fires occurred, was 2.064 per cent., or 20.114 per 1,000 anil $1.07 pei capita. There were 337 fires where loss was incurred, and 461 distinct losses of which seventy three were uninsured, sixty-three on contents and ten on buildings. Two fires extended beyond the building, and fifteen beyond the floor where they originated. There were forty-three tires, wth a loss of $100 or more, eighteen with a loss of $500 or more; and twenty-nine, with a loss of $1,000 or more. Pile heaviest loss at any one fire during the year was at the Stevens block, on February 8, with a total loss from fire and water of $25,143.03, of which $16,976.8.5 wa> on building, and $8.i66 t8 on contents The department was in actual service 601 hours; laid 131,650 ft. of 2 1/2-in. hose, 41.180 ft of 44-in. hose: raised 8.388 ft of ladders, carried on ladder trucks, and 972 ft. carried on hose wagons a total of 9,360 ft.: used 11,429 gals, of chemicals from chemical engines, 3.491 gals, from hand extinguishers— a total of 11,920 gals. The firelighting force of the department, which is a strong one anil most efficient, is divided into seven engine: ten hose: five ladder and four chemical companies. Its permanent membership consists of the following: Chief; deputy chief; assistant engineers, two; clerk of board of engineers: captains, twenty-four: lieutenants, twenty-two; enginemen, eight; drivers, thirty-seven; ladderrnen, ten; hosemen. twenty-eight; spare men. ten total. 144. Call force-Surgeon; assistant engineers, four; hosemen. fifty-one; laddermeii, eighteen—total, seventy-four. Firealarm service (permanent) Superintendent; assistant superintendent; operators, three: lineman -total, six. There are fifteen regularly appointed substitutes. Pile apparatus in service is as follows: ICngines, seven; hose wagons, seventeen; combination wagon; ladder trucks, live; chemical engines, three. There are two engines, two hose wagons, and one aerial truck in reserve. During the year one Seagrave aerial truck, 011c double-tank 40 gal. chemical engine, and one combination wagon have been purchased. It is recommended that one hose wagon be purchased for engine company No. 2 and that rubber tires be placed on every piece of apparatus. There are eighty-three horses in service and 212 firealarm boxes (142 public and twenty private) are installed. There are in service 13.400 ft of 2 1/2-in. hose and 1.200 ft. of chemical hose. The department has also a 3-way Deluge set. life nets, chemical pumps on hose wagons and trucks, and is well provided with ladders. During the year the department worked 7(10 hours on fires. A drill school has also been established at headquarters under the direction of Deputy Chief W. N. Avery, a graduate of the New YOTK city lire department Drill school. The cost of maintaining the department for the year ending November 30, 1906, was $216,938.80; for the Worcester Protective Department. $2,499.96—a total of $219,438.76; revenue for the year, $2,176.93.

Chief G. S. Coleman, Worcester, Mass.
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