Good Work of Presque Isle Firemen

Good Work of Presque Isle Firemen

Although with a direct pressure of 100 pounds at the hydrants, a fire which broke out recently at Presque Isle, Me., caused a total destruction of the building. The fire, which occurred in the store of B. S. Green, gave the local fire department under Chief H. R. Pipes a hard fight for quite five hours. The building had stood on the west side of the street for 30 years, occupying 200 by 100 feet space. The structure was one and two stories, built of wood and had partition walls of wood and brick. In front of the destroyed building the street was 66 feet wide and provided with a 10-inch main. The hydrants available were four double 6-inch and one single 6-inch, set about 250 feet apart. The blaze was discovered by a policeman, who turned in an alarm at 2:45 a. m. The fire started in the basement, due to a red-hot heater, and when the firemen arrived the flames had spread through the walls and basement. Nine fire hydrant streams were. well maintained all the time. One Eastman turret pipe was also used with good effect. The men did best when they stopped the fire between G. H. Freeman’s large store and the wooden warehouse connected at the rear, thus saving 10. more buildings on Bride street. Three thousand feet of cotton rubber-lined hose were laid, and of that only one length burst. The loss on the property and contents, consisting of clothing, dry goods, boots, shoes, hardware and drugs, was $200,000. Chief Pipes reports that owing to the able work of his men and the fact that the good pressure remained constant during the time the fire was fought, a serious conflagration was averted.

Arthur E. Round, of Attleboro, Mass., has probably learned wisdom enough not to build his next garage and workshop of wood. It will put temptation in the way of a second incendiary, if he is so unwise.

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