Good Work of Worthington Pumps.

Good Work of Worthington Pumps.

John W. Moran, chief engineer of the pumping plant at Fall River, Mass., makes the following favorable report to H. R. Worthington upon the new engine installed in that city. The high percentage of running time, 8,599 out of a possible 8,760 hours in the year, or 98.10 per cent., and the yearly duty, which includes every pound of coal burned at our station, of 90 2-3 million ft.lb., under our erratic pumping conditions (which as you know, with no reservoirs, means anything from an 11-million gal. per hr. gait at certain hours of the day, to a 3 1/2-million-gal. gait at others) must make you feel that the 10-milliongal. Worthington pumping engine installed at Fall River is both a highly efficient and economical pump. Under any kind of favorable pumping conditions, that is, running at about an 8 to 10-million-gal. gait regularly, it would sail close at all times to its guaranteed 135-millionft.-lb. duty. For the year 1910 I returned to the Water Board $2,965.07 in coal, that is, I saved that much money in the amount of coal burned as compared to the best previous year in the history of the station. I have for the year just ended, 1911, shown a further saving of 504.70 over 1910, which means that in the two full years ending December 31, 1911, that your Worthington pump has been running, I have saved the City of Fall River, in coal alone, over the best previous year with the old pumps, $6,430.84, which means after paying the interest on the original investment, 43,000 that I can establish a sinking fund at 3 per cent, with the remainder and retire the cost of the pump in about 18 years.

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