GRAIN ELEVATOR BURNED

GRAIN ELEVATOR BURNED

Wooden Building Fire at New Bedford Threatens to Involve Valuable Property.

Chief E. F. Dahiil, of New Bedford, Mass., reports that he had a very warm blaze in a grain elevator recently, which threatened a lot of property in the vicinity by sparks carried by a high wind along the course of the fire. The building in which the fire originated was a wooden structure 100 by 50 feet, two stories high and not equipped with any fire protection. The fire lasted three hours. When the members of the department arrived the whole building was a mass of flames. The nearest hydrant to the place was 500 feet and it was necessary to employ 45 men, one steamer, 2 motor pumping engines, 2 combination chemical wagons and 2 aerial trucks to keep the fire from spreading. Fortunately there were three hydrants, set 250 feet apart, and a waiter pressure of 03 pounds to help in the fight. The number of feet of hose used was 4,300, two lengths of which burst. Chief Daliill writes that sparks from the fire carried by high winds up the railroad track ignited the railroad ties for abopt a quarter of a mile, also set fire to a waste mill and finally ignited the roofs of ice houses on the shore of Wash Road Pond, half a mile away. The alarm was given from box 334 at 10.38 a. in. and a second alarm was ordered from box 441 at 10.4(1 a. m. Engine Company No. 1, in charge of second assistant engineer, was sent to the ice house fire, where the flames were spreading so rapidly that an Ahrens-Fox machine was ordered to stop their progress. A two-inch stream from a deluge set, two 1 1/4-inch streams and two 14-inch streams from steamers were employed before the fire in this locality was stopped, as the ice buildings were large wooden structures entirely empty. The destruction of these houses shows the danger from wood shingles on roofs. The elapsed time between the roof igniting and the walls of the building falling was only 20 minutes.

Chief Edward F. Dahiil, New Bedford, Mass.

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