GREATER NEW YORK FIRE NEWS.

GREATER NEW YORK FIRE NEWS.

The grist of Chrisimas fires has been somewhat extensive this year and the results of Santa Clans and Christmas-tree burnings are yet to come in.—Acting Battalion Chief James J. Convey, with his driver, Adam Metzler, in speeding to a small cellar blaze at One Hundred and Forty-fifth street and Eighth avenue, Manhattan, collided with an east-bound Kingsbridge car. The chief’s wagon was smashed and the horse was cut, while the acting chief and his driver were thrown out violently on to the sidewalk. Convey, though badly hurt, helped his driver, whose fore head was laid open, to rise; then they walked to tile fire, Convey with two ribs broken! Convey, who is foreman of the truck company at One Hundred and Forty-third street, is taking the place of Battalion Chief Root, who recently had his nose and arm broken and was otherwise injured by a precisely similar “accident” at Eighth avenue and One Hundred and Fortieth street, when Metzler escaped unhurt. The trolley car drivers in that territory are utterly reckless, and the police are nowhere. The motormen take no notice of the approach of the firemen, and the police take none of die derelictions of the motormcn. And so it goes. Firemen, horses, apparatus, they are of no account in the eyes of the trolley car men and their owners, the Metropolitan Street Railway company. Time must not be lost, and, if in making up lost time a fireman or two or a valuable team are killed or badly hurt or a piece of costly apparatus is smashed up, that’t the city’s look-out.—Commissioner Lantry has received a check for $250 from Edwin II. Wcatherbce, to be added to the Firemen’s Relief fund as a token of his appreciation of the firemen’s work at a fire in his house. No. 240 Madison avenue, Manhattan, a few weeks ago. The commissioner has also transferred to the Relief fund $1.2,000 received from the sale of badges giving admission to fire lines.—George L. McKenna, of hook and ladder truck No. 30, crawled amid flames and choking smoke through two rooms and into a third to rescue a mother and her baby who had been overcome in the early morning fire that wrecked the rear of the fivestory tenement 19 East One Hundred and Thirty fourth street, Manhattan. Followed closely by Firemen Weiss and Russell, of the same company, h;placed a small ladder so that it led to the fire-escape on the second floor, where some men, women and children were. As he started up the ladder one of the men plunged through the well and would have gone through to the strott, only that his foot caught in the railing, and lie hung head downwards. McKenna went up the ladder carefully, so that its swaying should not dislodge the man. He then threw off Fis helmet McKenna supported the man with his bead and shoulders until he could get an arm round him. On the balcony above McKenna righted him, and then passed Mrs. Kennedy down to Weiss atul Russell, followed by eleven-yearold Mary Kennedy, the sevenmonth old Kennedy babv. and five-year-eld Winifred Kennedy. When the two men had got down, McKenna, Wei” and Russell climbed to the fourth floor, but found no other tenants, and concluded that they had all escaped. So he returned to the third floor, when the man whom he had just rescued shouted up to him that his wife and baby were still in the building on the to > floor, from whose windows now belched smoke and flames. I tiling Weiss and Russell to remain near the window, McKenna diced through the window of the flat. Three feet above the floor flames were swirling. Sputtering and coughing from the smoke, McKenna crawled through the parlor into a bedroom, but found no one. Then lie crawled into a third room, where on the floor he found a woman with a baby in her arms. He tore the baby loose from its unconscious mother and made the trip back to the window and passed the child out to Weiss. Then taking a long breath of fresh air. he dived hack into the flat and dragged out the mother. This time the trip to the window took twice as long, and at times he felt his senses going. Nearly exhausted when he reached the window with the woman in his arms, he nevertheless climbed down two stories to the top of the thirty-five-foot ladder, where Weiss and Russell relieved him and took the woman to the ground. She and the baby, both unconscious, were sent to the Harlem hospital. They will recover. It was a gallant deed and should entitle McKenna to a medal for bravery.—A young clerk, Charles Breitweizer, during a basement fire at 883 Eighth avenue, Manhattan, heard that an old woman was left in the top floor of the deserted flat. He climbed up to find her, but she had escaped. On the way down he was lost in the smoke, and was found by Battalion Chief I lowe lying unconscious on the floor where he had been caught by a back-draught. At the hospital his condition was thought serious. The firemen were delayed almost half an hour in getting to the fire through the failure of two men to turn in an alarm. Each ran to a different Ixix and each thought he had sounded the alarm by merely opening the box door.—During a tenement house fire, probably incendiary, at 221 East One Hundred and Tenth street, Manhattan, one was killed in trying to rescue his family, and a fireman and others were badly hurt. A young hoy distinguished himself with two other lads in helping an old blind woman to escape to the ladders, where all were brought down safely by the fireman, fhe boy “kept cool,” as he had been instructed to do, and before he got down stairs took care to shut all the doors to prevent the flames from spreading as he remembered he had been told he should do, if a fire broke out. Acting Fireman Folding, thinking others were left in the house, started up the stairs, which were shaky. Going up the third flight he felt the framework giving way beneath his weight, and jumped for a window beside the staircase. As Folding threw his weight upon it this frame gave way. and he fell out into the areaway. Firemen heard his groans as he lay in the areaway after the fall of three stories. They dug him out of the debris, and he was hurried to the hospital, his skull being badly fractured, in support of the theory of incendiarism, some of the tenants told that a family of Italians, who moved away recently, predicted that there would be a fire in the building.—A fire in Central Park is a very rare event; but the other day the engines were summoned for the first time within the recollection of the oldest park employe. Several barrels of naphtha were stored in Dr. South wick’s nursery, opposite West Seventyninth street. One of these barrels exploded, and the small storage building was soon in flames. The firemen lost some time in connecting a long line of hose from Central Park West and then along the transverse road. The fire by this time had seized upon several shanties and a number of department carts and destroyed them. There was nothing else for the fire to work upon but a few barrels of cement and it went out.—Francesco Rogo has been arrested in Brooklyn as a firebug caught in the act of trying to burn his store.

Fire Marshal James Horan.

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