GREATER NEW YORK.

GREATER NEW YORK.

HOWEVER other departments may be affected by the recent election for mayor in this city, it is not thought that there will be any great, or many changes in that of the fire department of Manhattan borough. The principle of letting very well alone will probably beaded up to by the incoming fire commissioner, whoever he may be, so far, at least, as the uniformed force is concerned. In Brooklyn, also, the same policy will most likely be pursued, and the leveling up principle adopted, by means of which the firemen of the two greatest boroughs of the consolidated city will be placed on a footing of perfect equality, so far as regards pay and being in the line of promotion. With respect to Long Island City, the same policy may possibly be followed out; but the conditions in its respect are not quite identical with those of New York and Brooklyn. ‘The immense amount of outlying territory added to the jurisdiction of the fire commissioner of Greater New York -much of it ruralwith only volunteer departments and second or third-rate apparatus to operate to say nothing of districts, in which the houses and population are scattered, the roads vile, and the water supply scantywill largely increase the responsibility of the new fire commissioner,and ought to cause him to be very careful in the selection of his subordinate officers, so as to guard against extravagance and jobbery,on the one hand, and to provide for efficiency,on the other. In every case, Mayor-elect Van Wyck will have to consult the best interests of the citizens of the second city in the world, and will, therefore, need to display the utmost caution in his appointment to the position of fire commissioner. In the same way, since Greater New York takes over the entire supervision of the many water works and sewerage systems within its enlarged limits, similar scrupulous care must be exercised in the selection of the commissioner under whose purview, among other departments, shall fall the whole of the responsibility—for the proper oversightof the water,sewerage,and building bureaus. It w’ould seem the wiser, healthier, and sounder policy for the incoming commissioner to advocate the retention in every case of those subordinate officers whose experience, skill, and thorough knowledge of the working of their respective bureaus has been already shown and tested. Of such officers there are many in each city, fire and water works engineers and other water w’orks men, who have made the question of the water supply their life-study and have successfully wrestled with, and mastered the intricacies of the problem in some cases where the difficulties connected with the water supply have been manifold, and to less skilful engineers and purveyors would have proved insuperable. Their efficient,and at the same time economical methods, as well as their continuous and faithful efforts to serve their respective cities are surely worthy of recognition; and the best recognition that can be afforded such employes, in whatever department, is surely to keep them in office, irrespective of their political affiliations. In municipal departments merit and faithful service should form the bases of all such appointments. We trust it may prove so in the present instance.

GREATER NEW YORK.

0

GREATER NEW YORK.

GREATER New York may now be looked upon as an accomplished fact, and thus the metropolis of the United States will become the second city in the world, so far, at least, as regards population; London standing first with considerably over 4,000,000 inhabitants (4,231,431 according to the last census), as against Greater New York’s 3,100,000. With the political aspect of the matter LIRE AND WATER is by no means concerned. It is really of no consequence w hat are the politics of the future mayor of this city, provided only he is independent of any machine rule and the dictates of any political boss. Considering what vast interests are at stake in the Greater New York that is to be, the politics of its chief magistrate should be the last thing thought of at the next election. Hut, as the new mayor will have an enormous amount of patronage to dispose of, and the filling of all the most responsible offices in the city will be in his hands, it is very obvious that the mayor of Greater New York should be no party man, but one who should stand out preeminently as the possessor of strong common sense, thorough business experience, conspicuous for his incorruptible integrity, honesty, firmness, and tact. While he should be a man of up-to-date ideas, he should likewise distinctly favor a liberal-conservative policy rather than one of revolutionary reform so-called, and should remember that a little over-caution is infinitely to be preferred to a headlong leap—often blindfold—into rash and not thoroughly considered changes. It may be possible to shoot Niagara; up to to-day, however, the experiment has never been successful. Such a mayor, if elected, will not be of those who will give in to the dictates of this party or that, but in his appointments will take care to place as chiefs of departments and in other responsible positions such men as are themselves not only fit for the post, but also pledged to see that their underlings are of like calibre. Otherwise Greater New York will see all its municipal offices, except possibly the “non-partisan” police board, manipulated by some political party, whose policy will not be shaped for the benefit of the citizens but of whatever political machine happens to be on top. To put it shortly: The mayor of Greater New York must be mayor in fact as well as in name, else home rule will be a farce. A conspicuous feature of the charter deals with matters germane to the subjects with which Luo AND n u is chiefly concerned. It provides for a board of public inprovements, subservient to the board of estimate and apportionment, which will have jurisdiction over (among other things) the water and sewer systems of the city, under a president whose duty it will be to enforce harmonious ac -tion upon the heads of all departments represented in it. The power of acquiring new water works, however, is vested in the municipal assembly, consisting of two houses—elected by the citizens, while the mayor appoints the head of this department, as he does those of all that are non-elective, with the power to remove his appointees during the first six months of his term. The commissioner of the water department and the commissioner of the sewer department will appoint a deputy in each of the five boroughs into which Greater New York is divided. The fire department is single-headed—the commissioner appointing a deputy-commissioner for Brooklyn, to have his office over there and to look after the fire department of that borough and the borough of Queens. The fire commissioner will also appoint all bureau heads and all firemen, it will thus be seen that, with a partisan mayor, the commissioners—or, at least, the majority of them—will be partisan, the deputies will also be partisan; so also will be the heads of bureaus, and so the various subordinates down to the lowest of the rank and file—politics, not fitness being the criterion. It is for the citizens of Greater New York to provide against what can only be a disastrous state of things if they allow a political boss of whatever party to nullify the whole object of the charter by substituting machine rule for home ruie.