Greenfield Water Report

Greenfield Water Report

The Water Commissioners and Superintendent of Fire District No. 1, of Greenfield, Mass., in their report for the period from April 15 to December 31, 1914, state that the estimated population supplied is 11,755 and the total consumption for 9 months was 326,758,500 gallons, of which 113,455,100 gallons passed through meters, the percentage metered being 34.75. The average daily consumption was 1,188,213 gallons, being 97 gallons per day to each inhabitant, 101 gallons per day to each consumer and 495 gallons per day to each tap. The water works were constructed in 1872, are owned by the Fire District and the source of supply are reservoirs on Glen Brook, well near Green River. The modes of supply are gravity and emergency pumping and the capacity of reservoirs is: Upper reservoir, 45,000,000 gallons; lower reservoir, 26,000,000 gallons; Rocky Mt. reservoir, 2,500,000 gallons. The water commissioners are C. C. Dyer, William F. Aiken and Thomas L. Lawler, and the superintendent is George F. Merrill. The total cost of new construction is given as $10,349.96. The treasurer’s report shows 1914 water rents, $20,396.47. The number of new services connected was 93. Extensions of main pipes within the district totaled 5,857 feet and outside the district, 1,898 feet; 14 hydrants were set. The report further says: The lower reservoir was thoroughly cleaned during the early part of April, and the spring rains quickly filled it. The water obtained from the reservoirs has been of good quality during the past season; and we were not troubled with algae growths getting into the lower reservoir, although they were present in the upper one during the latter part of the drouth season. As we drew the water from the upper reservoir, and used nearly all the stored water for consumption during the early part of the dry weather, and then closed the gate holding water in the upper reservoir, we avoided any difficulty from algae. This growth passed away, so that late in the season water could be used without its being noticeable. The latter part of the season has been a phenomenally dry period for water supply, and we found it necessary to begin pumping about August 15th, and the new pumping station was started pumping water from the new well. This station was operated until November 20th, with several shut-downs for a few days, as more water was pumped than we were consuming. The supply of water obtained from the new well, as shown by analysis of the State Board of Health, is chemically superior to our other supplies, and, on account of being filtered, is undoubtedly a much safer water from a sanitary point of view. During the last season we pumped one hundred and seven millions of gallons of water, as shown by records of the Venturi meter at the pumping station. The total cost of operating the station is $1,952.38. Twenty-four and one-half per cent, of the total amount of water supplied for one year has been pumped during the year from January 1, 1914 to January 1, 1915. The first part of the pumping season we operated the pump both day and night, and during the time were obtaining nearly two million gallons of water from the new well. It was found that we could supply the town by operating during the night shift, and the last two months the station was operated in this way. Last year’s service of the new pumping station demonstrated that this new plant will be much more efficient, and the cost of pumping would be much less, with the very much better water supply obtained. It seems advisable that the old pumping station should be discontinued, and sale of the boiler and pumps be made to as good advantage as possible, in order to avoid expense of further maintenance. And in this connection, if the old station were discontinued, the pipe in the old force mains, of which there is about half a mile of 10-inch cast-iron pipe, could be used to advantage in some other part of the system, by relaying it. The work of additional water supply, which was begun last year, has this year been completed. In the early part of the season the grading of the filter bed was completed, and it was found desirable to pave the slopes, in order to avoid their washing from wave action. A small permanent storehouse building was constructed on the northerly side of the lot at the pumping station. Also, as further protection against further changing of the river channel near the new pumping station, a pile jetty was constructed in order to divert the current to the westerly side of the stream. The water commissioners purchased from the Pecumptuck Memorial Association a small tract of land adjacent to the new dam, at a cost of $100. The regular maintenance charges of the department have remained practically normal during the season, and on account of the short fiscal year there is considerable in the amount appropriated for this department. We have hauled all the pipe used in construction work during the last year with the automobile truck, and it saves considerable time in transporting material and getting men to and from work; also adds greatly to the efficiency of the department, as compared with the same service with horses.”

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