Handling a Water Shortage

Handling a Water Shortage

Last summer the eastern and middle sections of the country suffered from one of the worst droughts that had been experienced in many years. This year the far west is the sufferer from the same cause. California is in the midst of what is said to be the severest dry spell in its history. The drought strikes the San Francisco section at an unfortunate time, as in 1925 the new improvements and additions of the Spring Valley Water Company, amounting to an increase from 42,000,000 to 66,000,000 gallons per day, would have been ready to meet the emergency and would have given ample water for all consumers. The company’s appeal is addressed to all varieties of water users—industries, commercial establishments, offices, hotels, apartment houses and householders. All are strongly urged to conserve water in every possible way and to watch carefully for leaks and have them repaired.

Prompt and active co-operation in the matter of water conservation was that of Chief Thomas R. Murphy, of the San Francisco fire department who, as soon as the situation was understood, gave instructions on May 17, to have the city’s high pressure system filled with salt water. This is the first time that this has been done since the high pressure auxiliary system of San Francisco was installed shortly after the great fire in 1906. Two pumping stations have been maintained in readiness to turn the water from the bay into the high pressure mains, but heretofore they have never been used. The action of Chief Murphy is another illustration of the advantages of close co-operation between the water and fire departments.

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