Hayti’s President Killed in a Fire

Hayti’s President Killed in a Fire

On August 8 a fire caused by an explosion of the powder magazine attached to the National Palace at Port au Prince, Hayti, broke out in the building, which was of wood, and was terribly shattered by the shock of the exploding gunpowder. In less than an hour the whole structure was destroyed. President Cincinnatus Leconte, who was asleep at the time—3 o’clock a. m.—was not seen after the fire had burned itself out, and is known to have perished in the flames, although the members of his family were saved, but with difficulty, as they woke up only to find themselves surrounded by the flames. The first explosion was followed by others, each caused by the immense quantity of munitions of war stored in the cellar-magazine of the palace to be available for use whenever any of the periodical revolutions to which Hayti is liable should break out. As the whole city was roused by the uproar, and crowded round the palace, the work of the firemen was greatly hindered. They managed, however, to save from lire, but not from the shattering effects of the explosion, all the buildings in the neighborhood, in which they were aided by the fact that the palace was an isolated structure. Over 400 persons, it is said, were killed or injured. The body of President Leconte has not been, probaby will not be, recovered, nor is the cause of the explosion known, although many suspect it was the result of a conspiracy.

Beverly, Cal., has a new 20,000-gallun pump for the foothill slope. The supply is from wells and is conveyed to the city by a 3-mile-long main from the reservoir in Beverly Hills and distributed all over the suburb through 15 or 18 miles of main. Cost of equipment was about $25,000.

Toronto, Out., is “almost persuaded” to buy two Seagrave combination chemical and hose trucks, the engines to be air-cooled.

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