Heavy Damage to Factory in Detroit

Heavy Damage to Factory in Detroit

An early morning fire of unknown origin recently resulted in heavy damage to the automobile body factory of C. R. Wilson Company, Detroit, Mich. The structure, which was five-story brick with three-story wings, about nine years old, occupied an area 300 x 1,000 feet northeast of the city, and an alarm was telegraphed at 3.02 a. m. Hand chemical extinguishers were the only protection in the factory and as the fire started under the loading platform outside the building it had acquired a good hold when discovered, and flames were ascending to the top of the building on the arrival of the department, under command of Chief William McGraw. Thirteen motor pumpers, four steamers, five motor fire trucks and one hose drawn engine were employed by the 264 men engaged, and 15,250 feet of cotton rubber-lined hose were laid, of which 11 lengths burst during the fire, which delayed the men considerably in their work. There were 16 6-inch, some double, available, with water pressure of 28 pounds. No hydrant streams were thrown, but 12 engine streams were played at a time, from 1 1/4, 1 1/2 and 2inch nozzles. Owing to the length of the building it was necessary to Siamese in some cases and deluge sets were also used to good advantage. Water mains in the street were 10 and 12 inches. It required 12 hours’ work before the “all out” signal could be given, but the department succeeded in confining the fire within the building of origin. The loss on factory and contents was estimated at $500,000.

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