Heavy Loss in Ship Yard Fire of Uncertain Origin in Vancouver

Heavy Loss in Ship Yard Fire of Uncertain Origin in Vancouver

A fire, involving a loss estimated at between $1,500,000 and $2,000,000, occurred recently in the ship yards of J. Coughlin & Sons, situated on the south side of False Creek, in Vancouver, B. C., Can. The buildings in which the fire occurred occupied a space of 400×1,000 feet, were 80 feet in height, and were constructed of wood. They had been built six months. Wooden partitions separated the boiler-shop and the offices from the other parts of the structures. The fire, the origin of which is in doubt, was discovered at 2.30 a.m.. by a workman on the night shift in the boiler-shop. The alarm came by phone via the Western Union, at 2.30 a.m., and the fire had gained great headway when the firemen, under Chief J. H. Carlisle, arrived. The employes, about eight or nine hundred in number, working on the night shift, all escaped in safety, but a fireman was killed by falling timbers, when the roof collapsed. There were three steamers, nine hose wagons, two aerial ladder trucks, and a city service truck. Six 6incli double hydrants were available. 300 feet apart. Twelve hydrant and ten engine streams were thrown, the pressure at the hydrants being 105 pounds, gravity system, from an 8-inch main. There were 16,000 feet of cotton rubber-lined and wax-gum treated hose laid, of which two 100-foot lengths burst. Nozzle sizes were 1 1/8 to 1 1/4 inches. The fire burned for 10 hours. There were two S.OOO-ton vessels just about completed and lying at the wharf. These were saved by towing them out into the stream and suffored no damage. Another vessel of similar tonnage, over half completed, was badly damaged on one side and will have to be practically rebuilt, the steel plates on side and decks being badly warped by the intense heat. A fourth vessel of the same type, work on which had been started only a short time before the fire, was sunk, and broke her back when the gantry collapsed. The fire, coming at a time when ships are badly needed, was a serious loss to the shipbuilding fraternity and the Dominion.

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