High Bridge To Be Torn Down

High Bridge To Be Torn Down

It is proposed to tear down the immense structure spanning the Harlem River, New York City, known as High Bridge. This structure was built in 1848 as part of the original Croton aqueduct system to convey the water from the then Westchester county— now the Bronx borough—to Manhattan Island. Its original cost was $963,000. The Port and Terminal Committee of the Board of Estimate of New York City adopted a report recently recommending that High Bridge be entirely removed. While the idea at first was to remove two piers which now menace navigation in the Harlem River, the engineers who examined High Bridge came to the conclusion that were the piers removed the structure would be unsafe, and they accordingly recommended that the bridge be torn down entirely. On May 3rd, 1839, the New York State Legislature passed a law authorizing the water commissioners to construct an aqueduct over the Harlem River, with arches and piers, the arches in the channel of the river to be not less than 100 feet from the usual high water mark of the river to the under side of the arches. The bridge was contracted for the following August and was sufficiently completed in time for the admission of the Croton water into the city on July 7, 1842, though not completed in accordance with the original plan until 1848. High Bridge is 1,430 feet long and 25 feet wide. It connects West 175th street and Tenth avenue (Manhattan) with Aqueduct avenue, near East 170th street, in the Bronx. The top of the viaduct forms a way for foot passengers, but no provision has ever been made for vehicular traffic.

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