High Pressure System for Salem

High Pressure System for Salem

Plans have been approved for a high pressure system and an increased water supply for Salem, Mass., to cost approximately $500,000. According to Patrick J. Kelley, director of public works, the improvements will be completed before Jan. 1, 1916, and the city will have not only an adequate supply of excellent water to meet demands of both Salem and Beverly for an indefinite period, but Salem will be protected in the future by a water pressure nearly double the present one. At the present time, the normal water pressure is 50 pounds. On June 25, 1914, this fell to 40 pounds and in some instances even lower. Under this new plan, the pressure will run from 85 to 90 pounds. This will be obtained by building a new reservoir on F’olly Hill in Danvers, which is some four miles from the center of the city in a direct line. According to the plans, the reservoir will be about 210 feet above the sea level, will be of concrete, about 400 feet long by 150 feet wide and 25 feet deep, and capable of holding 10,000,000 gallons of water. The plan for the increasing of the present supply provides for taking an auxiliary supply from Ipswich River, in which Beverly is jointly interested and will share one-third of the expense, which will be about $150,000, Salem paying $100,000 and Beverly $50,000. The present daily average consumption of Salem and Reverly together is about 5,000,000 gallons. The work of digging the ditch, through which the water will be flowed by gravity from the river to the pumping station, will be done by day labor. The high pressure system will cost $350,000. In both instances provision has been made for the payment of the cost by long-term bonds, maturing in from 30 to 40 years. The highressure system is for Salem only. At Wenham Lake will be erected a new pumping station. The new pumps will pump the water from the lake into the new reservoir on Folly Hill. In conjunction with this new supply, the entire city is to be equipped with iron pipe of larger dimension than formerly. When Salem completes its high pressure service the present reservoir, which is situated in Beverly, will probably be abandoned. From this reservoir at the present time runs a 20-inch main to Salem. This main was laid in 1864. The estimated cost of the items for the high pressure service is: For reservoir and land damage, $125,000; pumping plant, $75,000; pipe line, $150,000.

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