HIGH WIND MENACES RIVER FRONT AT WILMINGTON FIRE

HIGH WIND MENACES RIVER FRONT AT WILMINGTON FIRE

Wilmington, N. C., was threatened with a conflagration a short time ago when the Chadbourne Lumber Company’s plant, situated at the river front, was partially destroyed by flames. The seriousness of the fire was due principally to the high wind that was blowing and to the fact that its late discovery enabled the flames to gain great headway before the arrival of the department. The velocity of the wind was so great that flying embers were blown blocks and threatened the many surrounding buildings. Chief Charles Schnibben and his department, confronted by this dangerous fire, did excellent work in preventing the spread of the flames, and even succeeded in saving a large part of the lumber plant from destruction. The head of the Chadbourne Company and the local press have given Chief Schnibben and his men great praise tor their excellent work. The lumber plant occupied about 2 1/2 acres of space and was composed of 1and 2story buildings, most of which were built of wood. These structures were built eight years ago. The fire started from an unknown cause at about midnight and was under control in about 1 1/2 hours, although it was 12 hours before it had been entirely extinguished, it originated in the boiler room, and upon the airival of the department the office, lumber shed and boiler room were burning. The loss on the damaged buildings was $6,000, while their value was estimated at $30,000. The loss on the contents, consisting of lumber and machinery, was $24,000 and the value, $50,000. The property destroyed consisted of the boiler plant, there being five boilers in the room, stacks, etc., boiler house, water tank, etc., the saw mill proper including the electric lighting system for the entire plant; two brick dry kilns, live rolls and connections; the office of the company; a large lumber shed, the mill work shop, the frame shop, stables, and about 300,000 feet of lumber. Wilmington has the standpipe system of water supply. Two 4-inch and one C-inch double hydrants situated from 300 to 900 feet apart and several private hydrants, were available for use. There was a pressure of about 50 pounds at each of the city hydrants. Seven hydrant and two engine streams were thrown from the 5,500 feet of Paragon brand cotton rubber-lined hose in service. Nozzles of from 1 to 1 3/4 inches were used. Thirty-five men were at the fire, along with the following apparatus: One steam engine, two motor combination chemical and hose cars, two hose wagons and one hook and ladder truck. The department’s fire boat, which is equipped with a type 15 American-La France motor pumping engine, was used, and Chief Schnibben stated that it is his belief that it saved the nearby steamer sheds of the Clyde Line from destruction. Revenue cutter also rendered some assista nee.

View of Fire at Lumber Plant at Wilmington, N. C., at Its Height.
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