HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE NEW BRITAIN SYSTEM.

HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE NEW BRITAIN SYSTEM.

P. J. EGAN. CLERK OF WATER BOARD.H. DAYTON HUMPHREY, PRESIDENT WATER BOARD.CLAYTON A. PARKER, WATER COM.SPILLWAY AT DAM 32 FEET WIDE.BASIN AT SITE OF DAM.

As a description of the New Britain system was given in a previous issue of FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING it is only necessary at the present time to review briefly the works from their inception to date. Construction was commenced in 1857 by building a reservoir known as Shuttle Meadow take, which impounded 650,000,000 gallons of water and covered an area of 175 acres, A cement lined pipe of 8 in. diameter conveyed the water to a small distributing reservoir in Walnut park, two and one half miles distant, from which the town was supplied in 186o a second iron cement-lined main. 12-in. in diameter, was laid, on account of the growth of the town and increased consumption. In 1883 a canal was constructed one and ;i half miles long, which intercepted several small streams and added materially to the supply. In 181JO it was found that the city had outgrown the storage capacity of the reservoir, and a new dam was const meted which increased the amount of water available to 1 .^oo.ooo.cxx) gals. This work was done by the Tro Public Works company, under the direction of ni engineer appointed by the city. A rew eas’ iron conduit of 24-in. diameter was laid by the C. H. Eglee company, thus providmg for an ; mple sttpph at that time A new gatehouse was also constructed from plans by P, M. Blake, of Newtbnville, Mass., who is t.ie present engineer of the works. In 1S92 another canal two miles long was constructed, which, in addition to the one built in 1883, controled the entire available watershed. On account of the large factories established and the rapid increase in population, the city was called upon to furnish an adequate supply to meet the necessities of these industries. This led the board in 1846 to look up a new source, of supply, which, after careful investigation, was in the town of Wolcott, six miles from the present supply, and known as Roaring brook. After a bitter light in the legislature, the right to take the water from that source was granted to New Britain. So imperative was the need for more water that the new source of supply was utilised as soon as possible by the construction of an intake half-way up the mountain, with the water carried by a double line of twenty-inch cast iron pipe to the city’s reservoir. This work was fully illustrated in FIRE AND WATER ENGINEERING at the time of its completion in 1898. In 1903 this new supply was further utilised by the construction of a storage reservoir, which consists of two dams each about 400 ft. long, a waste-way thirtytwo ft wide and storage Capacity of 200.000.00;• gals. The water from this reservoir is carried under the dam through a thirty-in. pipe and gatehouse to a paved raceway, down the moimtain to the intake, where it is taken across the valley up another elevation to a receiving basin with spillway 32-ft. wide; thence through a pond raceway, where the water is filtered through small stones several feet deep, thence to the distributing reservoir. While, this work was in progress, the board saw that the city was outgrowing its water resources and began a search for an additional supply. Finally a desirable source was found, and so far the best one, in the town of Burlington, nine miles from the city, consisting of several large streams and nine miles of watershed. After a contest in the State legislature the right to take water from these streams was secured. Plans for this new work, which are nearly completed, are as follows: The construction of a dam on the main brook, which for the present will be carried to a height sufficient to control the flow’. A 24-in. or 30-in. pipeline connecting this supply with the present 24in. pipe is so arranged that the city can use the nev or the old supply separately, or both jointly, in case of necessity. The other brooks can be added to the present system. As conditions call for further improvemtnt, an additional main to the city will be followed by a complete system of meterage. For the past four years the department have been replacing the mains in the centre and the factory district with 16-in. and 14-in. pipe and has changed all single nozzle hydrants for two-way and three-way. At present there are 475 public and about 100 nrivate hydrants of the Mathews, Corey, Ludlow, Walker, Holyoke and Chapman patterns. All the supplies to the system are by gravity and the pressure ranges from 50 lbs. to no lbs. Views of the new dam and portraits of the officers of the board accompany this article.

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