Hoboken Fire Department.

Hoboken Fire Department.

In his annual report for the fiscal year ending May 1, 1911, Michael A Dunn, chief of the Hoboken, N. J., Fire department makes several recommendations to the board of fire commissioners. Among these are the following: Another truck company with apparatus; purchase of two auto combination chemical engines and hose wagons; that ladder companies Nos. 1 and 2 be provided with Pompier ladders and life belts; the purchase of 2,500 feet of 2 1/2-inch fire hose, and that Assistant Chief Fenton be provided with automobile or horse and wagon. By the report it is seen that the manual force consists of one chief engineer, one assistant chi:f engineer, one clerk, one veterinary surgeon, nine captains of companies, eight lieutenants of companies, six engineers, one relieving engineer, five stokers, one relieving stoker, 14 drivers, two tillermcn, 29 hosemen, I I laddermen, making a total of 93 men, divided into five steam fire engine companies, one chemical engine company and two hook and ladder companies. The staff is composed of the following: Michael A. Dunn, chief engineer; William Fenton, assistant chief engineer; Daniel A. Haggerty, clerk; George W. Smith, veterinary surgeon; John Regan, captain (detailed as inspector of telephone and telegraph systems); Oscar Palmer, relieving engineer; James Tanner, relieving stoker; Carl A. Nestler, chief’s driver.

F.ngine Company No. I is manned by 12 men; John Green, captain. The engine is a first size metropolitan type, was purchased from the American-La France Fire Engine Co. in 1909, and is drawn by three horses.

M. A. DUNN, CHIEF FIRE DEPARTMENT HOBOKEN, N. J.

Engine Company No. 2 is manned by 10 men, Patrick A Foley, captain. The engine is a second size American-La France, purchased in 1894; was rebuilt by the same company at Elmira, N. Y., in June, 1903, and is drawn by two horses.

Engine Company No. 3 is manned by 10 men; Benjamin Kinsey, captain. The engine is a second size Amoskeag, purchased in 1897, was overhauled and repainted in 1908. The tender is a combination chemical engine and hose wagon, equipped with a single (10-gallon chemical tank; was built by the Combination Ladder Company and installed in 1908.

Engine Company No. 4 is manned by seven men; Simon Donohue, captain. The engine is a double 6n-gallon tank chemical engine, carries 200 feet of chemical hose, was purchased from Halloway Company, of Baltimore, in 1890, and relmill by the same company in 1903. Is now in good condition.

Engine Company No. 5 is manned hy 12 men, John J. Gilday, captain The engine is a secon size Amoskeag, purchased in 1897. The machi . -cry was overhauled hy the Consolidated Iron Works, of Hoboken, in 1908 and repainted by Messrs John Brede & Sons, of this city. The tender is a combination chemical engine and hose wagon, built by the Amertcan-La France Fire Engine Company, of Elmira, N. Y. equipped with a single 60-gallon chemical tank, and placed in service in 1908.

Engine Company No. 6 is manned by 12 men; Thomas Davin, captain. The engine is a first size Amoskcag. purchased in 1908, is drawn by three horses, and is in first class order. The tender is a combination chemical engine and hose wagon, built by the Combination Ladder Company and installed in 1998.

Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 is mannel by 10 men; George Busher. captain. The apparatus is an aerial turn-table truck, built by the Babcock Manufacturing Company, at Chicago, Ill, in 1889; was remodeled into a Hayes truck by the American-La France Fire Engine Company, of Elmira, N. Y., in 1898, and again overhauled and repainted by the same company in 1909.

Hook and Ladder Company No. 2 is manned by 12 men; Herman Brockmann, captain. The apparatus is a 75-foot, quick, self-raising American automatic aerial truck, equipped with Firestone side wire rubber tires; was purchased from the Amcrican-La France Fire Engine Company, of Elmira, N. Y., in 1909.

The department has two spare engines, one of which is a second size Clapp & Jones, rebuilt in 1898, is now in fair condition and kept in house of Engine No. 6; the other is a second size Amoskeag, rebuilt in 1904, and is housed in the quarters of Fingine No. 5. There are two extra wagons; one is kept loaded with coal for the engines and the other is used as an extra and for supplies; both are kept in the yard of Engine Company No. 5. The extra truck is an aerial turn-table apparatus, built by the Amcrican-La France Fire Engine Company in 1890. and is also kept in the yard of Engine Company No. 5. There are 34 horses now in the department. Chief Dunn also calls attention to the necessity of installing a storage battery system, together with an up-to-date switchboard to take the place of our present somewhat antiquated fire alarm system.

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