Hospital Fire at Richmond.

Hospital Fire at Richmond.

Responding to an alarm sent out from the Virginia Hospital, at 4 o’clock in the morning, Chief W. H. Joynes, of Richmond, Va., found the adjoining building of the University College of Medicine centrally located in the residence section of the city burning, fire coming through the roof and from the windows on every floor on the east side. Freezing weather, falling sleet and rain and icy streets, were unfavorable conditions the firemen had to deal with in making their way to the fire and getting to work. The building involved was a three and four-story structure, 120 x 150 feet, of brick and wood, built about 20 years ago, although a portion of it was sixty years old. The old part had studding partition walls, the newer portion, brick partitions, and no other means of fire protection. The fire, which was First discovered by a patient in the adjoining hospital. had apparently started in the front part of the building on the upper floor. A vigorous attack was made on the fire. The apparatus on hand included 1 first-size Amoskeag steamer, 2 first, 1 second and 1 third-size. La France, and 1 third-size Clapp & Jones engines, 6 in all. There were also combination chemical and hose wagons on the ground, also a 75-foot Haves and one 65-foot American truck, the latter with a quick ladder raising device. 4.850 feet of cotton rubberlined hose was stretched, and eight 2 1/2 and 4-inch single and double hydrants were available. They were set about 500 feet apart. The water fur nished from 6 and 10 inch mains at 21 to 25 pounds hydrant pressure, was scarcely sufficient to furnish good plug streams and supply the engines, hut six engine streams, from 1 1/8 to 1 1/2-inch nozzles were played on the fire. After burning 1 1/2 hours, it was controlled, without involving either of the adjoining buildings. On the north side, and only 16 feet from the burning structure, was a large tobacco factorv. having some 60 windows, with no fire protection. The hospital was damaged about $1,400; the patients, some 40 in number, being hurriedly removed by nurses and firemen, the tobacco factory escaped with a dam age of $10. The college building, with its contents of medical supplies, hooks, instruments, etc., used by the students, was burned out, the total loss being estimated at $200,000.

Residents of Vallamont, a suburb of Williamsport, Pa., are agitating the formation of a hose or chemical company.

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