HOUSTON SHIP CANAL.

HOUSTON SHIP CANAL.

An official report of the War Department on the Houston, Tex., canal declares the project feasible. The water route between Houston and the Galveston jetties is fifty-eight miles and Three-fourths long and is naturally divided into two distinct parts: First is the portion from the jetties to the Morgan canal and the city of Houston. The first section is through the open waters of Galveston bay and the Morgan canal, and is twenty-five and one-half miles in length. The second section passes through the San Jacinto bay and the river of the same name to Lynchburg, a distance of eight miles and threequarters, and thence up Buffalo bayou to Houston, a distance of twenty-four and one-half miles. Buffalo bayou is a tidal arm of Galveston bay, depending for its water level on the rise and fall of the tide in the bay. From Houston to Harrisburg, a distance of eleven miles, the bayou is narrow and tortuous, with a width rarely exceeding too feet and a low water available depth of about eight feet. The upper portion.within the limits of the citvof Houston, is the receptacle for the sewage and surface drainage of the city, and is constantly shoaling from this cause. There are several bends between Houston aad Harrisburg, round which sea-going vessels of a length of 350 feet could not safely be navigated; in some reaches the timber growing to the water’s edge is an obstruction to navigation. From Harrisburg to Lynchburg, where the bayou joins the San Jacinto river, a distance of sixteen miles, the bayou becomes wider and deeper; the curves are much wider and afford no serious obstruction to navigation. The depth of the water in this portion varies from twelve to tw;nty feet. From Lynchburg the San Jacintc river and bay are easily navigable to the north end of Morgan canal; for a depth of twelve feet; there are no abrupt or difficult bends. The remainder of the water route, from the north end ot Morgan canal to Bolivar channel, a distance of twenty-five and one-half miles, is a channel dredged to a depth of nine feet through silt, clay,sand, and shell—the natural depth along this line being about sixfeet. The cost would be small when compared with the vast commercial interests, concerning the entire West which are involved.

The water commissioners of Stoughton, Mass., have been restrained by an injunction from building the proposed water system. They had no power to make any change.

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