How Cement-Lined Pipe is Made.

How Cement-Lined Pipe is Made.

At Plymouth, Mass., there is a manufactory devoted to the making of cement-lined or jacketpipe, socalled. This consists of an inner shell, a jacket or outer shell, two cast iron rings (a male and female), a neat cement-lining inside the jacket and a neat cement-grout of filling between the jacket and shell. The shells and jackets are received at the shop in flat rectangular sheets of the proper size. The shells are of varying gauges, from No. 20 to No. 13 gauge, according to the size of pipe to be made, while the jackets are No. 26 gauge for all sizes of pipe. The shells are punched and rolled into cylindrical shape by machinery and riveted by hand, after which the male ring is fitted into one end and the female ring into the other. They are then lined with cement, in sizes above 12 in. by hand and in the smaller sizes by means of a revolving cone. After the lining has had sufficient time to harden or set, usually about twentv-four hours, the pipes are placed standing on end round the edge of a platform, and the jackets, which are punched, rolled and riveted in precisely the same manner as the shells, are fitted over them. The jackets, when rolled and riveted, are about 1½ in. larger in diameter than the shells, so that, when they are placed round them, there is a space of about ¾-in. all round between the shell and the jacket. This space is kept uniform by means of wedges at the top and a clamp at the bottom of the pipe. Liquid cement grout is then poured between the shell and jacket. After remaining in the shop twenty-four hours longer, the pipes are scraped and cleaned with cement and painted with a tarpaint, after which they are allowed to harden about two weeks before carted to the trench. All the water mains of Plymouth—49½ miles— are cement-lined pipe. The first were laid in 1855.

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